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90 Miles Per (US) Gallon on the NC700X

670cc

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I just love the way people (aka cagers) jaw drop when I tell them my MPG. Or refer to my NC as “basic transportation” Because they think of motorcycles as toys.
I am a motorcyclist and I consider all of my motorcycles and scooter to be toys. I have never commuted on a motorcycle and never will. I don’t run errands with motorcycles. My sole use of motorcycles is for pleasure riding, to go visit family, go on long distance travel/camping trips, or ride on forest roads. Since I consider motorcycles to be toys, it’s no wonder many non-motorcyclists would think the same. I fully realize some people in the USA use motorcycles as basic daily transportation.

On the subject of MPG, I do wish motorcycles could do better. I could be riding my Goldwing alone alongside a Prius with four occupants and that car could be getting better mileage than my motorcycle. I think the NC has the right idea in terms of engine efficiency, but the horrible aerodynamics of the motorcycle in general needs improvement.
 

Gixus

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In Europe the affluent use motorcycles as toys. But not the general public, they’re transportation. That’s why the NC is very popular there, being economical to run. Here, why spend money on a lowly 58hp, when you can spend the same amount and buy a sport bike. It’s just a toy.

I guarantee in the not too distant future, motorcycles in North America will be regarded less as toys as inflation skyrockets. I look forward to getting a nice gas guzzling pickup for peanuts in the future.
 

Sandspike

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Motorcycles are basic transportation in most countries around the world. I personally enjoy riding so much that i choose to ride almost all the time. I only start my truck to haul a load or pull my boat. Different strokes for different folks.
 

Harry2110

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Ive actually pulled a 75mpg(us) out of my 2016 DCT on my very first ride but i might have been riding it a bit more timid. On my next two rides i was able to get a avg of 69mpg but with tons of full throttle starts.

I have noticed that atleast on my bike if i can stay around 35-45mph(6th gear) the instant economy usually reads 90+ mpg so ill be testing that theory on tuesday with a long run on some slower country roads. On the highway fuel economy seems to dip into the 50s. Im trying to build up enough of a data set before my madstad gets in to compare what itll do to fuel economy. Now all of these numbers are with with shinko e705 tires stock sized in the front and a 150/70/17 rear. Honestly i dont think weight is as big of factor but your frontal surface area is the biggest variable in the bikes mpg ill have to get some front on shots to analyze to see how it plays into the equation as ive done some drag stuff on bicycles.

Onto the transportation topic, Im “carfree” and only own two wheeled vehicles and fought for my rights to do so for the economy as the only thing that makes a nc less economical than a hybrid is the tires not lasting as long. When you think about it even a bad fuel economy on a motorcycle is around 45-50mpg to get that in a car your gonna have a vehicle that is sluggish and boring or as in the case of my friends vw take diesel which is almost a $1 more per gallon ruining his miles per $ figure.

Bikes of all types have been flying off the floor lately and I think we might see a dramatic change in a America if it keeps going the way towards Europe in inflation and gas prices.
 
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670cc

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Ive actually pulled a 75mpg(us) out of my 2016 DCT on my very first ride but i might have been riding it a bit more timid. On my next two rides i was able to get a avg of 69mpg but with tons of full throttle starts.

I have noticed that atleast on my bike if i can stay around 35-45mph(6th gear) the instant economy usually reads 90+ mpg so ill be testing that theory on tuesday with a long run on some slower country roads. On the highway fuel economy seems to dip into the 50s. Im trying to build up enough of a data set before my madstad gets in to compare what itll do to fuel economy. Now all of these numbers are with with shinko e705 tires stock sized in the front and a 150/70/17 rear. Honestly i dont think weight is as big of factor but your frontal surface area is the biggest variable in the bikes mpg ill have to get some front on shots to analyze to see how it plays into the equation as ive done some drag stuff on bicycles.

Onto the transportation topic, Im “carfree” and only own two wheeled vehicles and fought for my rights to do so for the economy as the only thing that makes a nc less economical than a hybrid is the tires not lasting as long. When you think about it even a bad fuel economy on a motorcycle is around 45-50mpg to get that in a car your gonna have a vehicle that is sluggish and boring or as in the case of my friends vw take diesel which is almost a $1 more per gallon ruining his miles per $ figure.

Bikes of all types have been flying off the floor lately and I think we might see a dramatic change in a America if it keeps going the way towards Europe in inflation and gas prices.
If you’re interested in accuracy, note that the vehicle speed sensor is sensing a transmission gear and is therefore based off rear wheel speed. Your non stock rear tire size will probably introduce a small odometer difference. I ran that 705 in the 150/70 size before but I forgot what the correction factor was.
 

Harry2110

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If you’re interested in accuracy, note that the vehicle speed sensor is sensing a transmission gear and is therefore based off rear wheel speed. Your non stock rear tire size will probably introduce a small odometer difference. I ran that 705 in the 150/70 size before but I forgot what the correction factor was.
Ive got a garmin im using for fuel tracking as tires are a constantly changing variable but i want to say it was 3%
 

dduelin

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Yesterday I rode 295 miles to breakfast and back. The first half I was following a friend and he set a pace often 70+ mph. The tank mileage was 58 mpg. He went on to a lunch RTE. On the way home I set my own pace at 50-60 and the tank returned 74 mpg.

CD048BFF-2048-4B2A-ABC6-0310018EB1D2.jpg
 

Gixus

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Yesterday I rode 295 miles to breakfast and back. The first half I was following a friend and he set a pace often 70+ mph. The tank mileage was 58 mpg. He went on to a lunch RTE. On the way home I set my own pace at 50-60 and the tank returned 74 mpg.

View attachment 49501
I’m glad to see you were riding in the sweet zone with your buddy. (Wink.)
 

http404

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I put a smiley at the end of my post but I see for some reason it didn’t take. It was said tongue in cheek. I don’t care how people live or ride their bikes. I tend to have a dry sense of humour and it doesn’t always come across in the written word. As for trying to impose my preferences, I somehow doubt that anyone on this site is so week willed that theyd be influenced by my posts. No more than I would if someone were to state that the way to ride the nc is to never exceed 1000 rpm in any gear.

There are times I like to chug around, and then there are times I like a bit of aggression. I’ve owned numerous sport bikes with high power and redlines and I’d be lying if I said I redlined them everywhere I went. I’m sure like most riders I rode according to my mood. The nc for me is a bike that I enjoy for chugging around, and I do a lot compared to previous bikes. But I also like the fact above 3k it wakes up and has a satisfying surge of linear power. I will say I feel that an owner is missing something if they don’t enjoy that on occasion.

Ride safe.
I'm with you, man, not that I'm against anyone else. We're all brothers and sisters with opinions that vary, all valid. Chugging around at 3k and below is just fine, and I do it sometimes like most do, but the bike lives for me at 4-5k and I'm having a blast getting "just" 58-60 mpg while keeping it in the power band. I agree that not playing in that sandbox is to lose some of the unique character of the bike.
 

Gixus

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I'm with you, man, not that I'm against anyone else. We're all brothers and sisters with opinions that vary, all valid. Chugging around at 3k and below is just fine, and I do it sometimes like most do, but the bike lives for me at 4-5k and I'm having a blast getting "just" 58-60 mpg while keeping it in the power band. I agree that not playing in that sandbox is to lose some of the unique character of the bike.
I went for a 160 mile ride yesterday. Half of that was highway and the bike breezed along at 80 mph. Enough grunt left to accelerate reasonably at those speeds. The rest was backroads where I was between 3 to 5 k. Around 70 mph most of the time. This bike is so frugal I don’t enjoy riding in high gears at low speeds. I guess if there comes a day where inflation is so bad that I have to choose between gas or food, then I’ll be happy to ride it as slow as a bicycle, if that means I can ride and still buy food.

Right now I like the bike so much I’m eyeing Gs1250s. Even if I bought one down the road I somehow doubt I’d sell the Nc. It’s just too cheap on gas, and maintenance if you do it yourself is just plain easy.
 

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I went for a 160 mile ride yesterday. Half of that was highway and the bike breezed along at 80 mph. Enough grunt left to accelerate reasonably at those speeds. The rest was backroads where I was between 3 to 5 k. Around 70 mph most of the time. This bike is so frugal I don’t enjoy riding in high gears at low speeds. I guess if there comes a day where inflation is so bad that I have to choose between gas or food, then I’ll be happy to ride it as slow as a bicycle, if that means I can ride and still buy food.

Right now I like the bike so much I’m eyeing Gs1250s. Even if I bought one down the road I somehow doubt I’d sell the Nc. It’s just too cheap on gas, and maintenance if you do it yourself is just plain easy.
Same! We did about 200 yesterday. I ride similar 70 mph curves with my group of GS, RT, FJR, etc. and the NC isn't lacking against those beasts in the curves. Maybe even better, with less weight and major lean angle. The bike is assuredly more limited by my abilities more than the bike's. But highway, they could run away from me like a scared cat. Lucky for me they don't drop me when they could and we avoid the freeway anyway. I'm on by far the smallest bike in the group but the NC is just fine. Such a great bike and yet considered weak and boring by Luddite horsepower junkies. I have much more fun on the NC at 70 than on my VFR at 140. If I ever went 140, you know, which I don't, because that would be irresponsibly above the speed limit.
 
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