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Question Are there any aftermarket rear brake pedals that are longer than stock? Or ones that can be adjusted to add length?

16DCT

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I installed some new footpegs that allow you to bring the stock footpeg placement 1.5" forward to relieve some knee pain issues, but now the rear brake pedal is resting right next to the footpeg. And if there aren't any longer brake pedals, would it be a bad idea to have the stock brake pedal cut in half and then find someone to weld in 1.5" of new material to get the extra length? I have the DCT version so I don't need to do any modifying to the clutch side
 

670cc

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One possibility is to move the rear brake control up to the left handlebar, but it may be complicated or challenging (more so than extending a foot pedal). This thread discusses it: https://www.nc700-forum.com/threads...-brake-lever-on-nx750x-dct.15643/#post-217772

To answer your question, I am not aware of an aftermarket extended brake pedal. I have seen enlarged pads for the pedal, but I don’t think that will solve your problem.
 

TacomaJD

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Unless you're offroad, use your front brake most of the time and don't even worry about rear brake. Only use it when you need to, like starting off going uphill, encountering debris in the road, riding across gravels in a parking lot, etc. Otherwise, while on the road, front brake is where 70% of your braking power comes from anyways, that's why the front rotor is twice as big as the rear rotor. It's meant to be used, don't be afraid to use it! :cool:
 

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would it be a bad idea to have the stock brake pedal cut in half and then find someone to weld in 1.5" of new material to get the extra length?
I wouldn't hesitate to have the lever extended by a competent (certified) welder.

The extra length would increase your ability to add pressure to the rear brake and possibly locking up the brake easier.
 

TheIronWarrior

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Unless you're offroad, use your front brake most of the time and don't even worry about rear brake. Only use it when you need to, like starting off going uphill, encountering debris in the road, riding across gravels in a parking lot, etc. Otherwise, while on the road, front brake is where 70% of your braking power comes from anyways, that's why the front rotor is twice as big as the rear rotor. It's meant to be used, don't be afraid to use it! :cool:
Does the '16 model-year have linked brakes? Since the C-ABS puts a 3rd piston up front activated by the rear pedal, you do not achieve full front braking performance without using the rear brake.
 

670cc

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Does the '16 model-year have linked brakes? Since the C-ABS puts a 3rd piston up front activated by the rear pedal, you do not achieve full front braking performance without using the rear brake.
The only USA models that definitely had linked brakes (with 3 piston front caliper) were the 2012 and 2013. I/we have tried to understand what the current C-ABS term means, and my conclusion is that it simply means the ABS is a single channel dumb system that can’t independently activate the antilock pulsing on each wheel. To me it sounds like Marketing tried to put a positive spin on a negative feature. The 2021 NC750X now claims to have 2 channel ABS.
 

TacomaJD

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Does the '16 model-year have linked brakes? Since the C-ABS puts a 3rd piston up front activated by the rear pedal, you do not achieve full front braking performance without using the rear brake.
There are only a couple of the older year models that have the 3 pot front caliper, like my 2013 model. It has it. My 2016 model, however, does not have a 3 pot caliper.

There was a thread on the combined braking thing and how it works on here recently, and nobody seems to know exactly how it works.....if you do, please feel free to share.

I will say this though, the point you are trying to make is not applicable to anything I said about using front brake. Let's set aside the degree of interference of the combined abs for a minute.... Unless you are absolutely needing FULL front brake performance, like in a track riding scenario.....of which I do regularly on my 2013 with a 3 pot caliper with zero issues.....it doesn't matter. I have ridden both my bikes VERY aggressively, more aggressively than probably 90% of the NC owners in the world. The front brake performance by just grabbing the front brake on these bikes is fine, and is certainly not compromised by not using the rear brake in conjunction with it.
 

TheIronWarrior

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There are only a couple of the older year models that have the 3 pot front caliper, like my 2013 model. It has it. My 2016 model, however, does not have a 3 pot caliper.

There was a thread on the combined braking thing and how it works on here recently, and nobody seems to know exactly how it works.....if you do, please feel free to share.

I will say this though, the point you are trying to make is not applicable to anything I said about using front brake. Let's set aside the degree of interference of the combined abs for a minute.... Unless you are absolutely needing FULL front brake performance, like in a track riding scenario.....of which I do regularly on my 2013 with a 3 pot caliper with zero issues.....it doesn't matter. I have ridden both my bikes VERY aggressively, more aggressively than probably 90% of the NC owners in the world. The front brake performance by just grabbing the front brake on these bikes is fine, and is certainly not compromised by not using the rear brake in conjunction with it.

I was in on that previous thread about C-ABS. My understanding is that there is a proportional/delay valve inline with the rear pedal to progressively apply the middle pot of the front brake, possibly with a lower cut-off limit so a certain amount of rear brake can be applied with no front activation. This is just an accumulation of available media/marketing/etc. releases and no special inside technical information, so take from that what you will.

The only point I was trying to make is that your 70% power comes from the front brake is: a) an average brake bias figure under "normal" braking conditions, and b) not necessarily reflective when C-ABS gets thrown into the mix. It's possible that "full front-only braking" on a C-ABS model is giving perhaps only 50% of available brake capacity.
Not saying that 50% power is not enough, just saying the 70% figure is an "average" based on the distribution of brake forces when both are applied under "typical" conditions. Keep in mind it is possible to have 100% of your braking come from the front wheel if traction is good enough, even when applying both brakes (the "stoppie" is an extreme example). In situations with less traction, the brake bias tends to reduce because the tires will break traction with less load shift.

TL:DR, front only is likely enough for most situations, but that doesn't mean it's a smart or safe idea to avoid using the rear, let alone have it difficult/impossible to apply rear brakes, C-ABS or no.
 

Redbird

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The 2017 NC700X I bought used has both the shift pedal and the brake pedal cut and an insert welded to lengthen them both. Then they were dipped into something to give them a black coating. They are solid and working fine. With the extra length of the brake pedal, one turn of the adjusting screw moves the pedal pad 1/4". The previous owner must have been tall since his aftermarket pegs were down and a bit forward. I'm short so I have them set forward as you have yours. With the extra length, they are working fine.
 
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TacomaJD

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I was in on that previous thread about C-ABS. My understanding is that there is a proportional/delay valve inline with the rear pedal to progressively apply the middle pot of the front brake, possibly with a lower cut-off limit so a certain amount of rear brake can be applied with no front activation. This is just an accumulation of available media/marketing/etc. releases and no special inside technical information, so take from that what you will.

The only point I was trying to make is that your 70% power comes from the front brake is: a) an average brake bias figure under "normal" braking conditions, and b) not necessarily reflective when C-ABS gets thrown into the mix. It's possible that "full front-only braking" on a C-ABS model is giving perhaps only 50% of available brake capacity.
Not saying that 50% power is not enough, just saying the 70% figure is an "average" based on the distribution of brake forces when both are applied under "typical" conditions. Keep in mind it is possible to have 100% of your braking come from the front wheel if traction is good enough, even when applying both brakes (the "stoppie" is an extreme example). In situations with less traction, the brake bias tends to reduce because the tires will break traction with less load shift.

TL:DR, front only is likely enough for most situations, but that doesn't mean it's a smart or safe idea to avoid using the rear, let alone have it difficult/impossible to apply rear brakes, C-ABS or no.
I feel the 70% rule still stands because it's a measure proportional to rear brake application, not a measure of the full force a single caliper is capable of exerting. No matter what, there's still 2 pistons compressing the pads as hard as you want to depress the lever. No?
 

16DCT

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I wouldn't hesitate to have the lever extended by a competent (certified) welder.

The extra length would increase your ability to add pressure to the rear brake and possibly locking up the brake easier.
The 2017 NC700X I bought used has both the shift pedal and the brake pedal cut and an insert welded to lengthen them both. Then they were dipped into something to give them a black coating. They are solid and working fine. With the extra length of the brake pedal, one turn of the adjusting screw moves the pedal pad 1/4". The previous owner must have been tall since his aftermarket pegs were down and a bit forward. I'm short so I have them set forward as you have yours. With the extra length, they are working fine.
Good to know, thanks! I will mostly likely go this route.
 
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