Breaking In Tires

Joelt9791

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The NC is my first bike and I bought it used back in October. It had 7500 miles on the original tires and I have already added another 2000 and the rear needs to be replaced. I commute 70 miles roundtrip daily, mostly at freeway speeds.

Question is how do I break in a new tire? I heard they can be very slick at first and can be dangerous if you don't know what you are doing. Which describes me, first bike, first time rider. I asked a service guy at my local Honda dealer and his advice was just take it easy for the first 100 miles. This puzzled me because if I drive 100 miles on the freeway only the center gets broken in. I bought the Avon Storm tires if that helps. What do those of you seasoned riders do to break in your new tires?

Thanks,

Joe
 

CB4ME

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I had my new bike out for the first time today and slid the rear exiting a corner. So yes, take it easy on new tires. Open empty parking lots are helpful when scrubbing the tires. Again, go easy.
 

NC Rick

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Really, it will just be the first couple miles. I have scared myself in the driveway just after mounting up a new set, gassing it in the curve having it slide. Just be smooth and gradually add lean angle and throttle application. We commonly head out on to a racetrack with new tires, stickers and all, just getting a couple sighting laps and warming up the rider and everything is all good to go. I would worry if I was on a long piece of slab where I forgot about the tires and then stick it into an off ramp with gusto, that could be an issue.
 

Old Can Ride

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When a new tire pops out of the mold they use Paraffin wax so as to not stick in the mold. Paraffin wax is a white or colorless soft solid derivable from petroleum, coal or oil shale, that consists of a mixture of hydrocarbon molecules containing between twenty and forty carbon atoms. It is solid at room temperature and begins to melt above approximately 37 °C (99 °F); its boiling point is >370 °C (698 °F).

So, it usually takes about 100 miles to wear off the paraffin from the new tire rubber. That is why not riding in the rain on new tires is highly suggested. About like stepping on soap in the shower. After the first 100 miles the tires are ready to ride as the paraffin has wore off..
 
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Jelly

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Good choice on tyres, I have them too. :)

As said, slowly increase the lean angle and stay on the twisties for 100 miles.

The Avons are great on this bike (I've had em before on a sports tourer), they roll into the corners beautifully and so far (2.5k miles) they are wearing well too.
 

DirtFlier

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[When a new tire pops out of the mold they use Paraffin wax so as to not stick in the mold]

I've read in several places that at least the major tire makers no longer use a mold release agent when making tires. That being said, I still take it easy on the first ride. At least to me, 30-35 miles is enough, gradually leaning the bike more and more.
 

Griff

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So, it usually takes about 100 miles to wear off the paraffin from the new tire rubber. That is why not riding in the rain on new tires is highly suggested. About like stepping on soap in the shower. After the first 100 miles the tires are ready to ride as the paraffin has wore off..
I would tend to agree with this advice. Obviously one would also need to ride on dry twisty roads to ensure that the slickness is removed from the amount of tread that you normally use, but gently for the first 100 to be sure. Also , some tyres are quicker to break in than others. I found that my Michelins broke in reasonably quickly whereas the Bridgestones took a little longer.

One other thing. Never assume that a cold tire (no matter what the mileage) will function normally straight out of your drive. I always allow at least 10 miles for the rubber to warm up before trying aggressive cornering.
 
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SergeantChuck

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I read somewhere a few years back that it is not about "scrubbing the tire in" as much as it is about "getting the tire hot". Take the bike out on a 100 mile ride and get them really hot while not getting super aggressive on corners. After that you should be good. I just had a new set of PR4's installed and likely didn't change my riding style one bit but I'm not recommneding you do that.

I like what Giff said above. Always be careful on cold tires regardless how many miles they have.
 

Joelt9791

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Thank you to everyone that replied. I received the tires today and will take them tomorrow after work to get mounted. I will let you know how it went.
 
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