D609 Tires Longevity

vancesmith

New Member
You don't have to be hitting the twisties as fast as possible to appreciate the ride difference between the Avon Trailrider and the PR4. The Avon just flows well in any condition and the feedback matches that. Really it doesn't seem like there's a transitional behavior, or need for correction. It's easily as good in wet/cold too. It just seems to do what it's supposed to without any fuss. Beats me why a more affordable and all-purpose tire (compared to the PR) like this doesn't attract way more interest here.

As far as Bridgestone goes, the BT023 was a surprisingly good tire. No flies on that one. Right now I'm running Adventurecross AX41 on my WR250R for about a year and it seems to be a great tire for 50/50. Only thing to know now is mileage...
Part of the reason is that a helpful salesman quickly gets very quiet when you start to mention more affordable brands like Avon and Shinko.
 

greenboy

Active Member
Part of the reason is that a helpful salesman quickly gets very quiet when you start to mention more affordable brands like Avon and Shinko.
Avon isn't real cheap in the States, but with the Trailrider AV54 you are getting a premium dual-compound rear that lasts a long time and costs at least $30 less than the PR5. The similar-in-appearance Shinko 705 is a great bargain too, a lot cheaper though it won't clock as many miles. If the weather didn't vacillate so much and run to extremes where I lived I'd probably be happy with them. But once the road is a little cooler and/or wetter you really notice what a well-designed dual-compound tire can give you. So I'm sold on dual-compound for the climate here – at least Avon's formulations. Also it extends my riding season insofar as I don't have to slow down so much or pucker up during the late fall and early spring, those times when it's really pushing winter ; }
 

TacomaJD

Member
Avon isn't real cheap in the States, but with the Trailrider AV54 you are getting a premium dual-compound rear that lasts a long time and costs at least $30 less than the PR5. The similar-in-appearance Shinko 705 is a great bargain too, a lot cheaper though it won't clock as many miles. If the weather didn't vacillate so much and run to extremes where I lived I'd probably be happy with them. But once the road is a little cooler and/or wetter you really notice what a well-designed dual-compound tire can give you. So I'm sold on dual-compound for the climate here – at least Avon's formulations. Also it extends my riding season insofar as I don't have to slow down so much or pucker up during the late fall and early spring, those times when it's really pushing winter ; }
That's what I was thinking! I just gave like $330 for a set of Avon Cobras for my cruiser! But they will last every bit of 10-11k miles.
 

greenboy

Active Member
That's what I was thinking! I just gave like $330 for a set of Avon Cobras for my cruiser! But they will last every bit of 10-11k miles.
Yeah, my cruiser buddy used them on his custom Honda VTX1800 and really dug 'em for longevity and performance although he eventually darksided the rear.
 

greenboy

Active Member
My 2nd set, they wear and grip great. And I'm anti-darkside lol
Based on how well I saw it work on his VTX 1800 once he found the right tire (first one only got 15,000 miles before he took it off and didn't handle as well), I'd do it if I rode heavy cruisers. He could haul through canyons pretty fast and said he didn't have to work at it. I think his VTX weighed in near 800 pounds. But I sure can't see it on lighter bikes, especially if they only have the power of a NC.


2017-08-18 13;11;39
by greenboy, on Flickr


2016-08-27 15;54;19
by greenboy, on Flickr
 
Last edited:
Top