Information Gearbox noise

Wedders

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I always ride with earplugs but the other day didn’t put them in for the first time, on a short journey. When the bike was changing gear in S2 there was a mechanical noise like a loud click that I’d never heard before. Is this normal? Or should I make sure to use my earplugs all the time in future?
 

Havok

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My 2020 DCT makes a rather loud click when changing gears. Did right off the showroom floor with 17 miles on it. I always ride in S3.
 

bigbird

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If you think an NC750 DCT is noisy, try a Goldwing with DCT.
It sounds like a dozen elves with small metal hammers are tapping on the gears and shafts.
The NC750's that I have driven are silent in comparison.

One suggestion would be to do the clutch initialization procedure to see if that helps.
 

Wedders

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If you think an NC750 DCT is noisy, try a Goldwing with DCT.
It sounds like a dozen elves with small metal hammers are tapping on the gears and shafts.
The NC750's that I have driven are silent in comparison.

One suggestion would be to do the clutch initialization procedure to see if that helps.
Do you mean by the clutch initialisation procedure, the DCT reset? If so I’ve already done that not long after buying the bike. Thanks anyway.
 

bigbird

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Do you mean by the clutch initialisation procedure, the DCT reset? If so I’ve already done that not long after buying the bike. Thanks anyway.
Yes, that's what I 'm referring to.
If you did it early on and it didn't improve the noise then, it's unlikely it will change the noise now.
Are you using the suggested weight (10W-30) of engine oil?
If so is it synthetic oil?
You could try non-synthetic as suggested in the manual (Honda GN4 10W-30)
If you have already tried these suggestions, then I'm tapped out.
 

Wedders

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I haven’t yet changed the oil as I have only had the bike since the beginning of lockdown, and the seller told me it hadn’t been long since the last change so I don’t know what’s in it. I might do it during this lockdown for something to do.
BTW I usually use semi synthetic in my bikes. Rule of thumb if it’s a sports bike synthetic. If it a road bike none thrashing semi synthetic. Fit it’s an old or vintage mineral oil.
Thanks again
 

bigbird

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As an aside, according to a seasoned Goldwing mechanic who owns reputably the top transmission repair shop only for Goldwings in the US (Google justwings.com), he suggests to always run straight mineral oil in Goldwings and especially in their DCT transmission.
I don't take any sides in that debate, because I'm only a DIY mechanic, not a certified master tech.
His reason is that the only time he sees clutch disc glazing in a 'Wing that has not been purposely abused (intentional clutch feathering during ultra low speed maneuvers) is when synthetic oil has been used in the engine.
From my personal experience, my 'Wing always shifted smoother and quieter on mineral oil than synthetic.
That being said, the 745cc parallel twin and 1832 cc flat six are very different engines and have very different transmissions.
But if Honda recommends GN4 I'd at least give it a try once.
Maybe your trans will shift quieter; maybe it won't.
I do agree that DOHC high performance engines with redlines above 10k rpm require full synthetics.
I would suggest that any Honda lubrication engineer knows a helluva lot more about what's good for their engines than you or I do.
I always use grade and weight of oil the owner's manual suggests.
To me the brand of that oil is irrelevant, as specs are specs.
Of course Honda doesn't manufacture any oil or other fluids for their products.
But they do require their subcontractors to supply all parts of the bikes to their stringent specs.
I believe you guys in the UK are big on Shell and Phillips lubricants.
On my side of the pond everyone loves Mobil.
I use whatever's on sale LOL, as they all meet specs.
 

Wedders

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Thanks for the info. I’ve never heard of Phillips but like you say if it’s on the shelf at the right spec. It should do.
 

Rich Reed

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I haven’t yet changed the oil as I have only had the bike since the beginning of lockdown, and the seller told me it hadn’t been long since the last change so I don’t know what’s in it. I might do it during this lockdown for something to do.
BTW I usually use semi synthetic in my bikes. Rule of thumb if it’s a sports bike synthetic. If it a road bike none thrashing semi synthetic. Fit it’s an old or vintage mineral oil.
Thanks again
I've been buying, selling and restoring used bikes for the last .....well....a long time. My rule of thumb for used bikes that you actually intend to ride is to change the oil & filter, new rubber (one year old bikes with 700 miles on the Odo the exception), new chain & sprockets (again, the proverbial "I Goofed" bike, one year old and 700 miles, the exception) and a valve adjustment (except for I Goofed bikes). You just really don't know how the bike has been treated, stored and maintained. It's (relatively) cheap insurance. If all you are going to do is replace/repair the scratched body panels, bent clutch lever and broken foot peg and then blow it out the door for a profit, then it's the new owner's problem. Not a hard and fast rule by any means, and also limited by your own resources (money, talent, warm & dry work area, etc), so, YMMV.
 

Wedders

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I've been buying, selling and restoring used bikes for the last .....well....a long time. My rule of thumb for used bikes that you actually intend to ride is to change the oil & filter, new rubber (one year old bikes with 700 miles on the Odo the exception), new chain & sprockets (again, the proverbial "I Goofed" bike, one year old and 700 miles, the exception) and a valve adjustment (except for I Goofed bikes). You just really don't know how the bike has been treated, stored and maintained. It's (relatively) cheap insurance. If all you are going to do is replace/repair the scratched body panels, bent clutch lever and broken foot peg and then blow it out the door for a profit, then it's the new owner's problem. Not a hard and fast rule by any means, and also limited by your own resources (money, talent, warm & dry work area, etc), so, YMMV.
I usually do the same as you but, I have a 2018 Ducati Scrambler 1100 and thrown too much money at it. I paid £10600 for it and have spent at least £6500 on it. So I promised myself I would not do the same with the NC but it’s getting that way.
BTW I bought the bike off a mature owner who owned it from new and trusted his word about oil changes etc that’s why I was leaving the oil for a few months. But now you have shamed me I’ve ordered the oil and filters.
 
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