Hitch Mounted Carrier

Penguinsfan82

Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
74
Reaction score
67
Points
18
Location
North Carolina
Visit site
Hi all-
I am considering the purchase of a hitch mounted carrier for the 750X and was looking for any ownership stories on such an item. I want to be able to haul the bike with me without pulling out the trailer and the bed on my Tundra is just too small to carry the bike.
Any thoughts? Experiences? Obligatory horror stories?
 

Klap

Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2018
Messages
76
Reaction score
37
Points
18
Location
Canton, GA
Visit site
I’m interested in this also. I investigated this before my last trip, but was unable to find one rated for the weight of the NC700. The other parameter I looked at was price. If a trailer is the same price, I’d just as soon own the multi-tasking trailer.
 

Penguinsfan82

Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
74
Reaction score
67
Points
18
Location
North Carolina
Visit site
I’m interested in this also. I investigated this before my last trip, but was unable to find one rated for the weight of the NC700. The other parameter I looked at was price. If a trailer is the same price, I’d just as soon own the multi-tasking trailer.
Well I have a couple trailers, but they are bigger and more than I need to haul just one bike. And I like the idea of keeping it simple and just throwing the bike on the back of the truck and heading out. It may turn out to be an impractical idea for the NC750, but I will keep looking into it and let you know if I find anything that might work.
There are quite a few carriers out there that have a 600-1000 pound weight limit, but my concern is with loading and unloading and the risk of dropping the bike when handling it alone. I guess I need to consult YouTube for some instructions.
 

DirtFlier

Elite Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 1, 2014
Messages
1,022
Reaction score
57
Points
48
Location
Troy, Ohio
Visit site
At least to me, putting that much dead weight on the trailer hitch receiver is not a good idea. Get a lightweight trailer.
 

Penguinsfan82

Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
74
Reaction score
67
Points
18
Location
North Carolina
Visit site
At least to me, putting that much dead weight on the trailer hitch receiver is not a good idea. Get a lightweight trailer.
I respect that, but can I ask why? The hitch is rated for 1000 pounds tongue weight, payload of the truck is rated at 2080. The bike is 478 wet and the carrier is about 100 pounds.
I am not being snarky, but really want your opinion on why it's not a good idea BEFORE I invest in the carrier.
Thanks!
 

DirtFlier

Elite Member
Site Supporter
Joined
Dec 1, 2014
Messages
1,022
Reaction score
57
Points
48
Location
Troy, Ohio
Visit site
I seem to recall that most trailers apply 200 lbs or less to the hitch in downward force. My guess is that if a trailer applied 1000 lbs of downforce on the hitch, it would make the tow vehicle handle unsafely.

The payload rating of the truck assumes that the weight is distributed evenly over the rear axle. When you apply 600+ pounds to a carrier that is xx-inches behind the rear axle it multiplies the force applied but for the life of me, I can't recall those formulas.

OK, do whatever you feel is right. :)
 

Klap

Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2018
Messages
76
Reaction score
37
Points
18
Location
Canton, GA
Visit site
I seem to recall that most trailers apply 200 lbs or less to the hitch in downward force. My guess is that if a trailer applied 1000 lbs of downforce on the hitch, it would make the tow vehicle handle unsafely.
I had researched this before a trip up north, and now I recall ( after reading your post) why I did not pursue it. I was concerned with the same issue, too much weight too far past the rear axle. I consulted a structural engineer, and she agreed- it would adversely affect the truck’s handling, and with the carrier positioned a foot ( at least) behind the tailgate, would exert a LOT more than Just the weight of the bike.
I am just guessing, but I’d say you could ebuy a small suitable trailer for not much more than the cost of a carrier rated for 500 lbs.
 

melensdad

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2018
Messages
1,033
Reaction score
413
Points
83
Location
usa
Visit site
I seem to recall that most trailers apply 200 lbs or less to the hitch in downward force. My guess is that if a trailer applied 1000 lbs of downforce on the hitch, it would make the tow vehicle handle unsafely.

The payload rating of the truck assumes that the weight is distributed evenly over the rear axle. When you apply 600+ pounds to a carrier that is xx-inches behind the rear axle it multiplies the force applied but for the life of me, I can't recall those formulas.

OK, do whatever you feel is right. :)
In a former life I owned a fleet of trucks and have towed more than my fair share of antique and modern diesel tractors.

What you say is very much vehicle specific. If we are talking about a 1 ton pickup truck then 500# hanging 2' behind the rear bumper will make the truck's front end pretty light but probably not dangerously so, especially if its a 4 door cab model with long wheelbase. On the other hand, a shorter wheelbase truck, a lighter duty truck, definitely going to be fun to drive. A medium duty truck would easily handle this. A diesel pusher motorhome probably wouldn't notice the weight on the back at all.
 

MZ5

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2012
Messages
1,715
Reaction score
79
Points
48
Location
Arizona, USA
Visit site
If the receiver hitch is rated for 1k, then it must be a class IV or a class V. What is the vehicle rated to tow? 10k lbs?

I’m wondering about tow rating because that will help us understand what the vehicle itself is expected to handle in terms of weight on the hitch.
 

Penguinsfan82

Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
74
Reaction score
67
Points
18
Location
North Carolina
Visit site
If the receiver hitch is rated for 1k, then it must be a class IV or a class V. What is the vehicle rated to tow? 10k lbs?

I’m wondering about tow rating because that will help us understand what the vehicle itself is expected to handle in terms of weight on the hitch.
I have a 2017 Toyota Tundra Crew Max with the 5.7 liter engine. It is rated to tow 9,800. I think I would be fine hanging the NC750 on the hitch, just looking for a good deal on a used carrier at this point.
 
Last edited:

MZ5

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2012
Messages
1,715
Reaction score
79
Points
48
Location
Arizona, USA
Visit site
Well, I'd not be too concerned about putting 500 lbs. on a narrow carrier in that case. I'll be curious to hear how the pickup feels (steering, handling, braking) with the bike on the back. I'd expect it to be a little squirrelly, but curious to hear.
 

Penguinsfan82

Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2020
Messages
74
Reaction score
67
Points
18
Location
North Carolina
Visit site
Well I decided to heed the mixed advice here and plan on using my trailer instead of the hitch mounted carrier. Well, the conversation here plus the horror videos of the carriers breaking on You Tube...
So I spent yesterday morning repacking/replacing wheel bearings on the old trailer, pressure washed it, planning to stain the deck next weekend. I will order some automatic locking wheel chocks t be installed and travel with a bit more peace of mind.
Then I took the NC for a short cruise of 50 miles or so to enjoy the gorgeous November weather.
 
Top