How to reset the PGM-FI / MIL light from a safety fault?

Joined
Aug 8, 2018
Messages
54
Reaction score
57
Points
18
Location
Perth, Western Australia
Visit site
I was able to clear the fault for $35 worth of parts from Amazon and learned some things in the process.

Here's what worked:

1. Honda OBD Adapter: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B091GQ44FN
2. OBD2 Scanner Car Diagnostic Scan Tool Check: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B083W1LGDP
3. Read the code then erase the code from the scan tool.
Nice work Supertux. I just ordered the OBD2 adaptor to keep in the toolkit. Chasing these issues is inevitable on an aging, electronics-ridden machine.

This is how I do my chain - fast, lazy, but still pretty safe. I like my hands.
  1. Put it on the centerstand
  2. lube the chain with the engine off
  3. then use the engine to spin up the back wheel for a few seconds to draw the lube across the O rings.
  4. Turn the engine off, wipe off any excess, and you're done.
 

showkey

Super Mods
Joined
Dec 2, 2012
Messages
1,938
Reaction score
121
Points
63
Location
Wausau WI
Visit site
ANOTHER NOTE: Proceed at your own RISK. Honda motorcycle are NOT ODBII compliant. Since motorcycles are under the OBD a manufacturer may choose to use any and all protocols and codes.

OBD-II compliant vehicle can use any of the five communication protocols: J1850 PWM, J1850 VPW, ISO9141-2, ISO14230-4 (also known as Keyword Protocol 2000), and more recently, ISO15765-4/SAE J2480 (a "flavor" of CAN). US car manufacturers were not allowed to use CAN until model year 2003, but as of model year 2008 and going forward, all vehicles will use the CAN protocol. Many manufacturers use one or more protocols on the same vehicle. One to read the mandatory OBD data and another to read manufacturer data and codes that are proprietary to that manufacture.

The damage risk is small but still there. So it’s buyer and user beware. Your results may vary........if you “smoke” the ECU it’s going to cost $$$. So carefully weigh the cost benefit before you jump in the pool.

If the paper clip or Honda service check connector is used correctly and the original or new fault is not present the light will (should) clear. Same for reading the codes. There is little or no chance an OBD a is going read any Honda motorcycle codes.
 

TheIronWarrior

Active Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2013
Messages
166
Reaction score
60
Points
28
Location
Halifax, NS, Canada
Visit site
My cage is a VW. Aside from the barest minimum of OBD requirements (mostly emissions-related) everything else is super-special-top-secret-classified-VW-only code. A select few 3rd party guys painstakingly reverse-engineered some code and hardware, but as far as I know, no one outside of VAG (or, at least without the very expensive VAG-made tools) can decode everything.
It's possible Honda made everything as OBDII-compliant as they could, but I'd say it's much more likely, especially where OBD compliance is not required at all on motorcycles (to my knowledge), that there is plenty of proprietary code in there. When you have a device that can read/WRITE to the control unit, I'd want to be pretty damn sure there's no significant probability of bricking the brain-box.

Edit A: It's also important to note that on a modern VW, the OBD port is also where you link in to change settings such as convenience (number of "convenience" turn signal flashes, open/close windows from the remote, etc.) and optional equipment (enable/disable fog lights, etc.). These can be modified by pure coding if you have the right hardware or by the aforementioned VAG-made or 3rd party tools, but you have the chance to effectively destroy the brains of the car if you do it wrong.
 
Last edited:
Top