Motorcycle Safety Foundation

mburgess

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Just gonna put this out there. You NEED to take a motorcycle safety course before really riding. As they all say, "it's not a matter of if, but when you will go down on a motorcycle". I had to take a class because i was 17 when I first got my motorcycle license.
 
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DirtFlier

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[All those in Europe countries may have stricter laws on motorcycle displacement size and ridiculous insurance rates.]

I don't get what you're trying to say here? Generally speaking, the tiered licensing in other countries is a good idea.

Here someone can go out and buy a Hayabusa or H-D Road King for their first motorcycle with predictable results. And in many states there is really no real penalty for riding a motorcycle without the proper endorsement.

There are now several states that offer motorcycle safety training that is non-MSF and they're doing a good job with a program that fits the needs of new riders, such as in CA. I was an MSF instructor/rider coach for 16 years, retired in 2006.
 
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Fuzzy

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Just gonna put this out there. You NEED to take a motorcycle safety course before really riding. As they all say, "it's not a matter of if, but when you will go down on a motorcycle". I had to take a class because i was 17 when I first got my motorcycle license. All those in Europe countries may have stricter laws on motorcycle displacement size and ridiculous insurance rates.
I took the class near a military base. I was new, but half the class were experienced riders who were all mad the Military made them take the class to be able to ride on base. By the end of the class they ALL stated they were glad they took it for the things they learned to eliminate bad habits and make them better riders.
 

itlives

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I have yet to take it even with a good offer from Ed Up.
Gotta make the time!
 

Ed Up

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I have a full class this weekend. My course is taught on Ft Chaffee in Fort Smith, AR. This weekend is about half military. 10-12 years ago we had lots of trouble with our military folks, as they were being forced to be there. The word is now out that it's a lots of fun and you will learn something, even if you have lots of experience. We now have military folks from all over coming to our course. We are not a really large business, but do train about 400 per year. I have lots of fun with it, but it sure cuts into my riding time.
 

itlives

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I have a full class this weekend. My course is taught on Ft Chaffee in Fort Smith, AR. This weekend is about half military. 10-12 years ago we had lots of trouble with our military folks, as they were being forced to be there. The word is now out that it's a lots of fun and you will learn something, even if you have lots of experience. We now have military folks from all over coming to our course. We are not a really large business, but do train about 400 per year. I have lots of fun with it, but it sure cuts into my riding time.
Ed,Ed,Ed....it's called delegating. Train someone so you can meet up with us at the Hillbilly Hangout next year.
 

robnpat

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Before I bought my NC in 2012, I took the MSF course, mainly for 3 things: 1. I wanted to actually SEE if I would like to ride a bike before plunking down $$ on something that I probably wouldn't like 2. I've never ridden a bike before (I've always had Honda ATVs since 1986). 3. Make my wife happy that I was thinking about safety first. I am SO glad I did. I didn't think riding was all that involved but it was more than I ever thought. I was so impressed that I took the BRC2 course in Spring 2013, and I think I will take it again next Spring just to brush up on some techniques that I know I am having some issues with.
 

Ed Up

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Ed,Ed,Ed....it's called delegating. Train someone so you can meet up with us at the Hillbilly Hangout next year.
I do have two that I can depend on. They are great, but I still feel the need to be there. The last 2 years I was waiting for the Hillbilly Hangout date. The date was posted after my yearly schedule got posted and I couldn't come due to class. Spring is when we are really hooked up. If dates come out early enough and I can manipulate my schedule, I will be there. I think it would be great.
 

DCTFAN

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MSF DS Trail Riding

MSF update!
I don't know if every state offers MSF Dirtbike Training,
but my goto facility is topnotch in every aspect.
I know because I have taken most of the classes offered.
Here is a short video of my Trail Riding Class that shows
how good it is: I took my CRF1000L Africa Twin to class.

[video=youtube_share;TRjQ7tY6IzI]https://youtu.be/TRjQ7tY6IzI[/video]
 

AsureDawn

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Where's the sandy creekbed? How're you supposed to learn anything without riding through a dry, sandy creekbed? :p
 

DCTFAN

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This MSF facility is 15 min from my place, in Alpharetta GA.
They use the Honda Powersports corporate facility.
I think this location is special in that they have this trail system
attached to their dirt training yard and they have made every obstacle you can imagine to gain experience on.
The instructor you saw in the vid has been to most of the gnarliest passes in Colorado
and told me, if you master these trails/obstacles you are ready for almost anything CO can throw at you.
Here I come 'Imogene Pass' :cool:
 

Old Can Ride

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DCTFAN you are lucky to have a dirt school so near you. As my knees heel, I want to get back to the dirt. However, I believe the school you went to is the nearest school to me. There are not a MSF dirt school with 500 miles of me. I learned what I know at the school of hard knots in the late 50's and early 60's. What I learned was at the track in the late 60's. I did attend the Rawhyde's basic class at Overland Expo a few years ago. That was when my knees where starting to go south. Soon the knees should be back in a few months, but I do need a refresher course.
 

Alfred_bham

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Here's what I found close to Webster, TX. :)

https://training.msf-usa.org/res/st...gfbpepns/ZENM7A==&zc=+UAv3LO6WRCnNVNWJCN4Ng==

DCTFAN you are lucky to have a dirt school so near you. As my knees heel, I want to get back to the dirt. However, I believe the school you went to is the nearest school to me. There are not a MSF dirt school with 500 miles of me. I learned what I know at the school of hard knots in the late 50's and early 60's. What I learned was at the track in the late 60's. I did attend the Rawhyde's basic class at Overland Expo a few years ago. That was when my knees where starting to go south. Soon the knees should be back in a few months, but I do need a refresher course.
Edit: Oops Dirt School!! Don't know if it's offered at any of those!! AK

Try This one: https://training.msf-usa.org/res/dbs/enroll/sites.aspx?ctgd=I2b9q5t8i0oh/DVLk5ZwCA==&z=77598
 
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AsureDawn

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You could go to Red Dirt or hit the trails around Forest Hill, LA. That's only about 250mi away, and the trails aren't too rough (especially at Forest Hill), as long as you stick to the single-track stuff. You'd probably want to bring a buddy, and be careful of the sand--it's feet deep in some places...fun stuff. ;)
 

DirtFlier

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[..By the end of the class they ALL stated they were glad they took it for the things they learned to eliminate bad habits and make them better riders...]

They also learned a lot of new things that are not intuitive. Too many guys learn via what I call "bar stories," that are mostly BS. And it's foolish to believe that all your years of car driving will help you ride a motorcycle safely, because other than the rules of the road, it is an apples & oranges comparison. Just look at all the bikes that are crashed the first day, first week, first month, etc. And forever those guys will be warning riders they see at a gas station "I had a bike once but...."

Sometimes I can hardly stop at a gas station without hearing someone's crash story! :-(
 
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Techrat

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I don't live near an MFS facility but I took two MFS approved courses before getting my license. One at a community college for $20 where the bikes were so small (125cc-150cc) that I couldn't finish the riding part, the other at my local Harley-Davidson dealer who had much bigger bikes (500cc) which were much more comfortable. The H-D class is usually $450 but they offer it free to veterans and first responders. So if you know a vet, cop, fireman or EMT who wants a bike tell them they might be able to learn for free.

The college course I took can get you a license at the end of class, while the H-D class is merely a class after which you still have to take the state test. Some H-D dealers have a state examiner come out to allow people to take the test on an H-D riding range rather than at the DMV. If you pass, you receive an endorsement that you can take to the DMV and get your license. I took the class at one H-D dealer and had to go to another on another day to test and then take the paper to the DMV to get my license.

I definitely advise anyone who wants to ride: Class first, License second, Bike third. It only makes sense.
 
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City Rider

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I don't live near an MFS facility but I took two MFS approved courses before getting my license. One at a community college for $20 where the bikes were so small (125cc-150cc) that I couldn't finish the riding part, the other at my local Harley-Davidson dealer who had much bigger bikes (500cc) which were much more comfortable. The H-D class is usually $450 but they offer it free to veterans and first responders. So if you know a vet, cop, fireman or EMT who wants a bike tell them they might be able to learn for free.

The college course I took can get you a license at the end of class, while the H-D class is merely a class after which you still have to take the state test. Some H-D dealers have a state examiner come out to allow people to take the test on an H-D riding range rather than at the DMV. If you pass, you receive an endorsement that you can take to the DMV and get your license. I took the class at one H-D dealer and had to go to another on another day to test and then take the paper to the DMV to get my license.

I definitely advise anyone who wants to ride: Class first, License second, Bike third. It only makes sense.
I fully agree with everything that you’ve said, specifically with last sentence. I took MSF course for two reasons:
1. To learn to ride a bike correctly and minimize risk of crashing.
2. To see if I’m going to like it.
Learning to operate any machinery correctly out of bat is crucial. If you develop bad habits early, it’s hard to root them out later.
For example, it scares me when I ride (or drive) behind a car when I can tell that driver on the front of me is hitting gas and brake pedals at the same time. I’ve seen even cab (“professional”) drivers doing that.
 
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