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New to the forum, New to Adventure bikes. Looking for suggestions.

Wyo4x4

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Hi all, I'm a long time cruiser rider (30yrs) now looking to go Adventure. I'm planning to retire in Central America and I'm trying to decide if an NC750x is going to hold up to the typical 3rd world roads found there.

I plan to explore every road I find over time as I spread out across the region.

I've ridden dual sport offroad so I'm familiar with what comes with that. I understand the NC is limited in ground clearance and suspension travel but I'm not expecting it to be a dirt bike or enduro. I do however want to go where the average 4WD can go... occasionally. Primarily I'll be riding rocky, muddy, sometimes graded roads and pavement. I've added a picture as an example.

I haven't ridden an NC so I'm concerned about how well the 54hp will do on the highway. Speed is not so important but the power to GTF outta the way is, as well as being able to pass quickly.

I'd go straight for an Africa Twin if it was in my budget. I like the NC DCT concept. There are others like the vstrom that has a few extra ponies so I'm just trying to do my research. I gave up my motorcycle endorsement a few years ago so I can't test ride anything and can't get my endorsement without a bike. I just moved to Tennessee from Wyoming and I don't know anybody here.

I've seen some pretty impressive NC750x travel videos on YouTube and that's why I'm here. I've attached a picture of an example of the roads in Honduras.20170712_162510.jpg

Thanks in advance!
 

670cc

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The thing to keep in mind is that under the adventure styled bodywork, the NC750X is basically a street bike, and a good handling one at that. The 50 some horsepower is totally adequate for me, but the suspension and weight is not dual sport quality by any means.

With the right tires and some suspension mods, the NC maybe just might do what you want, but it will take some modifications. If you're in mud, I know from experience that it's easy to pack the close front fender of the NC full of mud, and stop forward motion.

If a DCT is important to you, then you're limited to the NC or the Africa Twin. DCT choices are limited; I don't think the heavier VFR or the Goldwing is what you're after.

I really believe Honda has a big hole in their product line. Honda needs a CRF designated mini Africa Twin with a manageable size and weight of something in the 500-600cc category. That's what I would want for the adventure riding you propose. I'd want a dual sport frame with the CB500 engine in it.
 

GregC

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Also consider prior year Africa Twins. With the introduction of the very nice 2020, the 2017-18 are available pretty cheap (9-12k).


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Wyo4x4

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The thing to keep in mind is that under the adventure styled bodywork, the NC750X is basically a street bike, and a good handling one at that. The 50 some horsepower is totally adequate for me, but the suspension and weight is not dual sport quality by any means.

With the right tires and some suspension mods, the NC maybe just might do what you want, but it will take some modifications. If you're in mud, I know from experience that it's easy to pack the close front fender of the NC full of mud, and stop forward motion.

If a DCT is important to you, then you're limited to the NC or the Africa Twin. DCT choices are limited; I don't think the heavier VFR or the Goldwing is what you're after.

I really believe Honda has a big hole in their product line. Honda needs a CRF designated mini Africa Twin with a manageable size and weight of something in the 500-600cc category. That's what I would want for the adventure riding you propose. I'd want a dual sport frame with the CB500 engine in it.


Thank you for the first hand user information. Mud packing the front fender is the first I've read about that, for example.

I love the NC design and low center of gravity. Coming from a cruiser where I could stand up nearly a foot above me seat at a red light, the height of an adventure bike is a bit intimidating. With a 30" inseam I'm just able to get the balls of my feet on the ground. After a couple months riding a 650 dual sport and dumping it many times while stalled on a steep incline or stopped with both tires on opposite sides of a ditch, I'd really like longer legs. I guess it's just something I need to get accustomed to.

The DCT is not really necessary, I just like the idea and the no stalling. The fuel mileage is also great when talking $5+ a gallon for gas.

But alas, using a jigsaw to cut lumber can be done but it's not the right tool for the job. I need something that is going to hold up to rough roads.
 

670cc

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I guess this is why dual sports have high fenders. See mud packing on the NC in the following photo. Pine needles probably didn’t help the situation.

6F681E4F-DDFB-46FC-87B2-45DFFD092A6C.jpg
 

670cc

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Others may differ on their opinions on the importance of this, but if you went with a DCT and resided in Central America, and if the DCT had problems, would there be mechanics with the expertise to repair it? We seem to have some trouble here in the States with a few Honda shops still being unfamiliar with DCT service. If you have a conventional manual transmission, finding competent service anywhere might be easier, as well as it being easier to service yourself.

My personal approach to going out on motorcycle adventures in unimproved areas is to keep the motorcycle design as simple and reliable as possible, to increase my chances of getting back to civilization conveniently, timely, and safely. While Honda’s version of DCT has proven to be very reliable, Honda seems to have skimped on incorporating limp-home modes when the transmission or one of it’s sensors fails. I have observed that Honda DCT failures, while very infrequent, often seem to leave the motorcycle in a disabled state requiring a tow, rather than in a limp mode that lets you ride back to a place to make repairs.
 
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spads25

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Pretty sure you want something more capable than an NC if moving to Honduras..
 

Wyo4x4

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Pretty sure you want something more capable than an NC if moving to Honduras..

These are the things I needed to know. I've watched nearly everything on YouTube about the NC but they are not usually from owners with various experience with the bike.
 

Wyo4x4

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Others may differ on their opinions on the importance of this, but if you went with a DCT and resided in Central America, and if the DCT had problems, would there be mechanics with the expertise to repair it? We seem to have some trouble here in the States with a few Honda shops still being unfamiliar with DCT service. If you have a conventional manual transmission, finding competent service anywhere might be easier, as well as it being easier to service yourself.

My personal approach to going out on motorcycle adventures in unimproved areas is to keep the motorcycle design as simple and reliable as possible, to increase my chances of getting back to civilization conveniently, timely, and safely. While Honda’s version of DCT has proven to be very reliable, Honda seems to have skimped on incorporating limp-home modes when the transmission or one of it’s sensors fails. I have observed that Honda DCT failures, while very infrequent, often seem to leave the motorcycle in a disabled state requiring a tow, rather than in a limp mode that lets you ride back to a place to make repairs.

Valid point. It's easy sometimes to overlook the obvious. Thanks
 

superdedooperman

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I've been to Honduras once and the guy I stayed with rode a KLR650. He also had several different 250 street legal dual sports that they rode around on. Just a bit to think on. Some of those roads are rough! Just like you showed in your post. It was cool, I actually had been learning on a dirt bike here in the states and had never ridden in traffic. He let me ride one of the 250's following him in Tegucigalpa and it was exhilarating to say the least being my first time ever in traffic.
 

spads25

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Curious about the cost of retirement there vs. US.. Im assuming you have everything worked out. Any particular reason of Honduras? just wondering!
 

Wyo4x4

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I've been to Honduras once and the guy I stayed with rode a KLR650. He also had several different 250 street legal dual sports that they rode around on. Just a bit to think on. Some of those roads are rough! Just like you showed in your post. It was cool, I actually had been learning on a dirt bike here in the states and had never ridden in traffic. He let me ride one of the 250's following him in Tegucigalpa and it was exhilarating to say the least being my first time ever in traffic.

WOW!!! First time ever in traffic on a bike in Tegucigalpa? Talk about baptism by fire. Well, you should be able to ride anywhere after that. LOL
 

Wyo4x4

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Curious about the cost of retirement there vs. US.. Im assuming you have everything worked out. Any particular reason of Honduras? just wondering!

My wife is from Honduras. Many things there cost as much or more than here in the states... things that you would likely care to own. Lotsa Chinese junk there, all the average locals can afford. Most anything you want can be found in the two largest cities, you're just not going to get by cheap.
The cheapest things there are rent and food. If you shop at the supermarket, costs about the same as here. If you shop the markets and adjust your brands you can live a lot cheaper than here. Property is surprisingly high. Houses can be cheap is you don't mind having a zero lot and a standard built house... about $40k. Property prices got jacked up high due to the cartels paying super high prices for properties years ago. They just never came back down. Taking your time and searching, you can find some good deals.
If you rent for $3-4 hundred a month you can easily get by on $2000 a month.
 

rippin209

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Hi all, I'm a long time cruiser rider (30yrs) now looking to go Adventure. I'm planning to retire in Central America and I'm trying to decide if an NC750x is going to hold up to the typical 3rd world roads found there.

I plan to explore every road I find over time as I spread out across the region.

I've ridden dual sport offroad so I'm familiar with what comes with that. I understand the NC is limited in ground clearance and suspension travel but I'm not expecting it to be a dirt bike or enduro. I do however want to go where the average 4WD can go... occasionally. Primarily I'll be riding rocky, muddy, sometimes graded roads and pavement. I've added a picture as an example.

I haven't ridden an NC so I'm concerned about how well the 54hp will do on the highway. Speed is not so important but the power to GTF outta the way is, as well as being able to pass quickly.

I'd go straight for an Africa Twin if it was in my budget. I like the NC DCT concept. There are others like the vstrom that has a few extra ponies so I'm just trying to do my research. I gave up my motorcycle endorsement a few years ago so I can't test ride anything and can't get my endorsement without a bike. I just moved to Tennessee from Wyoming and I don't know anybody here.

I've seen some pretty impressive NC750x travel videos on YouTube and that's why I'm here. I've attached a picture of an example of the roads in Honduras.View attachment 39245

Thanks in advance!
[emoji1360]
652e4daf272965bf97c9c7e151bb6339.jpg
 

TacomaJD

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I would def mark the NC off the list for bikes for that type of riding on the regular. You definitely need a more off road capable bike. I'm not passing judgement, but I can't imagine being ready to retire to another country and the price difference between an NC700X and a new/used Africa Twin being a problem. The Africa Twin would be much better suited for what you need, and also available with DCT.
 

670cc

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I have to agree that the NC750X is not the ideal choice for the roads you pictured. If this were my "adventure", I'd be looking for a true dual sport bike. I agree that the Africa Twin would be a better choice than the NC750X, but I personally think the Africa Twin is too big, heavy, and unnecessarily high powered for primitive roads, unless you just happen to be a physically big person. Small bikes are more fun and easier to handle in challenging situations. I have great fun on my local farm roads with a Honda 250 dual sport, but it admittedly is a bit under powered for highway use. A dual sport in the 500cc range would be idea for the OP, but Honda's only offering in that range is the CRF450L, which has a raspy race-derived engine and an unusable, tiny 2 gallon fuel tank. I think you'll need to look outside the Honda lineup for what you need.

Perhaps the Kawasaki KLR650 would make sense, if it's not too tall for you. BMW might have some suitable mid size adventure bike offerings, but you have to put up with, as one of our forum members put it, "Bavarian drama". Or, maybe the Royal Enfield Himalayan 410cc might be a good choice. It has air cooled simplicity with some good off roading attributes.

CVUL4OSNF7MY7YGE7WC7FCFBZQ.jpg
 
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TacomaJD

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I agree, something like the Kawi KLR650, Honda XR650L, or even the CRF250L Rally model (little larger tank than base model) would probably be more ideal than the Africa Twin.



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I was just remembering my teen years when my older brother had a Honda CB750 4 cylinder and I, riding pillion, spent a week together with him and rode 500 miles or so from SoCal to “The River” (Colorado River) and back. We didn’t know back then that a 500 lb street bike with purely street tires wasn’t supposed to go on rocky & sandy washed out desert roads and trails, nor deep mud after a rain (me being there to push certainly helped at times). Somehow we managed and it sure was a blast! Oh, such naîveté. ;)

Many things become possible, even easy, if you just slow down. Assuming it’s not an enduro race or something.
 
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