Question about jacking up the bike for chain maintenance

Tom

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I'm looking for suggestions about jacking up the rear wheel for chain maintenance. Centerstand? Pit jack? Any thoughts?

Thanks, Tom
 

New Commuter700

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Put me down for my centerstand as well. This has been the easiest one to use that I've had so far. Not that I considered not having one, after all, I've NEVER had a bike without one. Yes, it does add a little weight but I still get around 75 mpg.
 

Griff

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Of course a centrestand is the obvious answer but if You don't have one then get a length of wood appropriately cut to fit under the head of the axle bolt to keep the rear wheel off the ground. Obviously it needs to be light enough to stow in a rucksack or luggage but strong enough to take the weight of the bike. Mine is 20mm X 34mm X 380mm
 

670cc

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The long term solution is the Honda centerstand, which should have been standard equipment on the bike, but became an accessory so Honda could charge you more money for it.

The short term solution, as Griff mentioned, is a stand that holds up one side of the rear axle, as in this example: Poor man's chain lube stand
 

dduelin

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Center stand for me.

The NC700 New Concept bikes were designed in response to the challenging economic conditions of the Great Recession. A lot of stuff changed when the US and the world economies tanked in 2008. The Big Four Asian manufacturers lost 40 to 60% of pre-recession unit sales between 2008 and 2012. Suzuki didn't even import 2010 bikes into the USA. IIRC back then a 2012 Honda CBR600RR was around $9,000, Suzuki WeeStrom 650 was $8200, the stone aged Kawasaki KLR650 and Honda XL650 were $6300 and $6700 respectively, and Honda brought three ground-breaking new NC bikes to market and they were built at a price to sell in Asia, Europe and US markets, in the NC700X's case, 1 dollar under $7000 USD. So, yes, Honda cut some corners and left off the center stand. I negotiated one into the deal on my 2012 and 2015 NCs.
 

670cc

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Honda continued the missing centerstand concept with the CB500 series, if I remember correctly. It seems the precedent has been set.

In the automotive world, things that were once options later became standard equipment. In the motorcycle world, is the opposite happening? Maybe not entirely. If you look at the typical basic motorcycle design, there’s really only a few things the manufacturer can remove without making the bike non-functioning or illegal, and that’s the centerstand, windscreen, and perhaps the passenger seat/pegs.
 

SilverRocket

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I feel if they included what we'd like on this bike (centerstand, higher windscreen, power port, heated grips) the price would be much higher and would reduce sales to new riders who don't know that they'll want those things later on.
Those entry or new riders need a bike with the lowest MSRP. This is a good thing, as it gets more people buying bikes, out of cages and saving gas and having more fun.
So they can buy or finance a lower price and add what they want later. True, Honda might lose some parts sales, like when riders decide to buy Givi luggage or Madstad windscreens, etc, but they are the only ones making that centerstand, so you want to finance a centerstand? No thanks.
 

hacksaw496

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Not to veer from the question, but I would like to lower my bike a bit and it has a centerstand (CS). I understand that lowering the bike makes the CS harder to use. Any others out there lowered their bike and had to modify the CS or remove/replace it? How much can you lower the bike and still use the CS? Or what other workarounds are there? I want to lower but would not like to lose the CS.

Sent from my computer using a keyboard... :)
 

rippin209

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Not to veer from the question, but I would like to lower my bike a bit and it has a centerstand (CS). I understand that lowering the bike makes the CS harder to use. Any others out there lowered their bike and had to modify the CS or remove/replace it? How much can you lower the bike and still use the CS? Or what other workarounds are there? I want to lower but would not like to lose the CS.

Sent from my computer using a keyboard... :)
Requires more effort or skill in rocking it onto the stand but I've heard of smaller guys (150lb) putting a NC that was lowered 1.5" - 1.75" they were younger guys though 30's I think
 

TacomaJD

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Not to veer from the question, but I would like to lower my bike a bit and it has a centerstand (CS). I understand that lowering the bike makes the CS harder to use. Any others out there lowered their bike and had to modify the CS or remove/replace it? How much can you lower the bike and still use the CS? Or what other workarounds are there? I want to lower but would not like to lose the CS.

Sent from my computer using a keyboard... :)
My NC was lowered when I bought it, somewhere around 1.5-2". I installed a center stand on it then utilized it when raising it back to stock height. It was a little more difficult to raise onto the center stand while lowered, but to what degree, I guess that depends on physical traits. I am 6'1" 225 and while I could tell a difference in ease of raising it onto the center stand after raising it back to stock height, it wasn't drastic. However, if you struggle getting it onto the center stand now, you may have a problem once lowering it. But if you can throw it up on it with no problem now, it probably won't be that big a deal when you lower it.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 
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potter0o

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Only thing I would add is if you have the back tire on some wood to elevate the back end it would make it easier to put on the centre stand. Visualize backing the bike on to a couple of plywood shims prior to the centre stand lift.
 

Junkie

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I have the opposite problem: with a longer rear shock, and taller tires, my centerstand doesn't lift the rear wheel off the ground.

I use a rear stand.
 
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