Need Help Rear Shock

bikemiser

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I bought a 2018 nc750x new a few months ago. It fits the bill just fine but I need to update the rear shock. When I hit a sharp bump like an expansion joint or similar spot in the road it give you a bone jarring jolt that the back shock just can't handle. I think the compression damping does not act quick enough. I'm wondering who has found a better shock for this bike. I'm sure the front forks need help too, but my main concern at this time is the rear. Any help will be appreciated.
Thanks,
Jim
 

670cc

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Fixing the front suspension will cost less than fixing the rear. You could do the front first and see how it helps.

As for rear shocks, you can fit an Ohlins shock/spring, Cogent can build you a shock, YSS may have a compatible shock, and if I remember correctly, some people have fitted a shock taken from an Aprilia model. For a new premium rear shock, you’re probably looking at around $500 and up. The forks can be improved for under $200.

I currently have an Ohlins shock on my NC700X.

Here is a recent thread on the subject:
 
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drdubb

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I've done Cogent on two motorcycles including my 700xdct, fine folks to work with and happy with the results. I had them rework the shock on my DR650 and replaced the shock on my NC700. Used their valves on the forks too.
 

TacomaJD

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I would say the jolting you feel is from the forks. The rear shock isn't the greatest on these bikes, but I don't believe that's where any harshness comes from.

Where is the preoload ring set to on your rear shock? If it is cranked fairly high, you can back off some preload and it may soften the ride a bit. The rear shock, in my experience lacks more in rebound than compression. It rebounds slowly.

The forks however suck all the way around. I have a 2013 NC700X I ride on track and a 2016 NC700X i ride on street. I recently sent the forks for the track NC off and got new springs installed for my weight and Racetech Gold Valve Emulators installed. Lightyears better than before. OEM forks on these are damping rod style and the small orifices in the damping rods will not allow enough fork oil to travel through quickly to absorb quick bumps. This is why you can slam on the front brakes and the front end dives like it's really soft, but feels rigid when you hit a quick bump in the road. The emulators take care of this. But it costed me $643 to get my forks built....of course that is paying a professional suspension guru to perform the install, but worth every penny in my opinion...for my application anyways. It handles so much better on track now.
 

bikemiser

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I would say the jolting you feel is from the forks. The rear shock isn't the greatest on these bikes, but I don't believe that's where any harshness comes from.

Where is the preoload ring set to on your rear shock? If it is cranked fairly high, you can back off some preload and it may soften the ride a bit. The rear shock, in my experience lacks more in rebound than compression. It rebounds slowly.

The forks however suck all the way around. I have a 2013 NC700X I ride on track and a 2016 NC700X i ride on street. I recently sent the forks for the track NC off and got new springs installed for my weight and Racetech Gold Valve Emulators installed. Lightyears better than before. OEM forks on these are damping rod style and the small orifices in the damping rods will not allow enough fork oil to travel through quickly to absorb quick bumps. This is why you can slam on the front brakes and the front end dives like it's really soft, but feels rigid when you hit a quick bump in the road. The emulators take care of this. But it costed me $643 to get my forks built....of course that is paying a professional suspension guru to perform the install, but worth every penny in my opinion...for my application anyways. It handles so much better on track now.
Holy Moly it would be cheaper to trade for a cycle with better suspension to start with .
 

670cc

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Holy Moly it would be cheaper to trade for a cycle with better suspension to start with .
Perhaps, but then said better suspended motorcycle may not have the other attributes that make the NC models desirable.

I have found that no manufacturer builds any vehicle that I like as it is. I have to pick a base model with most of what I want, then build it to my specs from there. My 2012 NC has about 40 modifications to get it where I want it. No manufacturer would build it that way.

So, if the NC needs suspension mods, that just the way things are.
 

TacomaJD

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Holy Moly it would be cheaper to trade for a cycle with better suspension to start with .
I am a left leg below knee amputee and ride the NC for the DCT transmission.

Suspension mods aren't cheap on any bike though. A new rear Ohlins TTX shock is $600. About the only way to replace rear shock cheaper than that is buying a used Aprilia shock or a used aftermarket shock someone took off their NC for whatever reason.
 

ducatiderek

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I bought a 2018 nc750x new a few months ago. It fits the bill just fine but I need to update the rear shock. When I hit a sharp bump like an expansion joint or similar spot in the road it give you a bone jarring jolt that the back shock just can't handle. I think the compression damping does not act quick enough. I'm wondering who has found a better shock for this bike. I'm sure the front forks need help too, but my main concern at this time is the rear. Any help will be appreciated.
Thanks,
Jim
Hi Jim , I have a similar aged bike that I bought new and the first thing I did was to take off all the spring pre-load , that helped a bit
Derek
 

dduelin

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I bought a 2018 nc750x new a few months ago. It fits the bill just fine but I need to update the rear shock. When I hit a sharp bump like an expansion joint or similar spot in the road it give you a bone jarring jolt that the back shock just can't handle. I think the compression damping does not act quick enough. I'm wondering who has found a better shock for this bike. I'm sure the front forks need help too, but my main concern at this time is the rear. Any help will be appreciated.
Thanks,
Jim
Jim,

The first thing one should do if thinking of adjusting or replacing the shock is to get some measurements of sag under your usual riding weight and configuration of luggage (if you have any). I suggest going about a suspension upgrade in a disciplined way so as to know where you are starting from and what needs to be done. Unless the 750s shock is materially different from the 700s the shock can't handle a rider weight of much over 165-170 lbs. Unless the rider is lighter the shock ends up operating in the bottom 50% of available travel and routinely bottoms out. There is some preload adjustment available with the threaded rings but measuring sag under your weight (rider sag) you can see if that amount of preload will get you to a target sag of 45 - 50 mm.

I've posted in the past how to measure sag but in a quick search this post is as good as any:

 
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