Rear tire slow leak...

Afan

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I have slow leak on the rear tire. Didn't have time to find where's exactly is leaking, a hole or against the bead, but my plan is to take off the rear wheel and tire, and to fix it myself.
I took off rear tires on my ST1100 but never on NC. I'm pretty sure I'm capable of doing it but if someone can point me in the right direction with some article or YouTube video, just in case?

Thanks.
 

670cc

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The rear wheel removal procedure is in your owners manual, including torque values for reinstallation.

The 750 and 700 rear wheels are mounted in the same way.

When it’s a slow leak and no puncture is obvious, it’s common for the tires to leak where the bead is in contact with the rim. The rim tends to corrode. I have had this happen myself on the rear wheel. You can break the bead and sand the rim leak area with very fine sand paper. I suggest reseating the bead with a proper tire mounting lubricant. Using detergent and water as a lubricant will just make your problems worse in the future.
 
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potter0o

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Agree with what 670 said above. I can be stubborn and try my own way first which often leads me to what others originally advised :) Only thing I would add is that you will need need a good compressor or air storage container to seat the bead especially with the larger rear tire. Investing in the tire lube will really reduce the frustration from breaking the bead and re-seating...don't ask how I know :)
 

Madison Sully

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If the leak is between the bead and rim, it should be easy to find with dish soap/water solution. I go ~10% Dawn to 90% water solution. It bubbles nicely at the site of any leak.
 

jimmy da vig

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Whoa, before you go through any of that check the valve stem. Sometimes for whatever reason that little needle inside works a half a turn loose. Do you have a valve wrench? Some valve caps have one built in.

Always start at the easy solution first. Then work your way to taking things apart.
 

Paulplex

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Cheers for this post, all who have added to it: same boat here! I'm losing ~6 PSI in an hour's ride - I've got a 12v compressor, so check before every ride right now - and again at rest stops. Rest tyre never gets below 36, but it's a pain!

I'll get out the soapy water when I get home and start checking :)

Sent from my Mi A2 using Tapatalk
 

Madison Sully

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I'll +1 on the valve stem. Whether the valve core has turned out a bit, some dust or crud is causing a leak, or rim corrosion exists making a leak at the rim-valve interface, I've seen all of these.

Oh, and I'd check as much as possible with the wheel on the bike; just spray a dish-soap and water solution around until you see a mound of bubbles forming. Shouldn't take more than 5 minutes.
 

frog13

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Old post but......yes , easy stuff first.
No doubt a visual check first.
Definetly check Schrader valve for proper seating......really fine threads there , don't use gorilla hands. : )
 

Madison Sully

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If you haven't changed out the entire valve yet, do that too.
I just had a slow leak between the wheel and the valve stem on one of my rides.
And yes, the valve core could be the issue, but could also be due to dirt inside. You can replace the core only, which could also fix slow leak in the valve core area.
Soapy water 100% before removing the wheel; I did so and avoided that hassle....
 

ST13Fred

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A slow leak will leak down to a certain point and stop leaking. 'Always put a few pounds over recommended, then look for leak that will now be more evident.
I took a tire off a vehicle twice after lo air dash warning came on but found no leak even in tub of water until I added more air. Lesson learned.
 

DirtFlier

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I had a slow leak on one of the rear tires of my Troy-Bilt lawn tractor and it defied all efforts to find it so I went to a big box store and bought the cheapest, largest plastic storage tub they had. With the tire inflated to max allowed pressure, I dunked the tire/wheel into the water and it took a few minutes but I was able to find the leak and make the repair.
 

ST13Fred

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Spot on. Putting the tire to max pressure + is the trick.
A slow i.e. small leak will stop leaking at some point and not show even in a dunk tub.
 

DirtFlier

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My Troy-Bilt mower DOES NOT have self-sealing tires so it won't "stop leaking at some point." I made it stop leaking by locating the pinhole and installing a black sticky worm. :)
 

ST13Fred

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A true 'self sealing' tire is perhaps what they call 'run flats'?
But I know for a fact a small hole can 'self seal' i.e., stop leaking and still have approximately 60+ % tire pressure.
This happened on a CRV a year or so ago.
 

ST13Fred

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sticky worm. :)
Also known as Gummy Worm. I've used them probably 30 or 40 times over the years.
If the hole is round and usually is, they work fine and cheaply. I've had one worm start leaking again,
pushed it into the tire and installed a new one.
That was the one that 'self sealed' on the CRV until I jacked tire pressure to 45+ psi.
 
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