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Right hand turn facing uphill.

OldBoots

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I have been practicing in my neighborhood the last few days. One location has a right hand turn pointed up a small hill. If you are starting from a stop pointing uphill you supposed to hold the bike in location with the rear brake (meaning right foot) while you manage the throttle and friction zone on the clutch to get started. If you are making a hard turn from a stop you are suppose to start with the foot on the side you are about to turn towards down. So I guess my point is I was taking this turn way too wide because you need the right foot to keep you from rolling back and going into the turn with my left foot down which means your body is starting aimed somewhat left. Am I overthinking this and should I just anticipate taking a turn like this wider than usual and just make sure there is space?

This may be a total newb question but it was weird enough that I wanted to ask more experienced riders.

Thanks for your help!
 

670cc

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I consider myself an experience rider, with over 40 years of riding time. I have learned to operate the throttle and front brake at the same time, with one hand, of course. I ease off the brake lever as I slowly engage the throttle. This works very well for me in a situation where I need my right foot or both feet on the ground. It may take some practice for a new rider to master, but it is the only method I know of for that situation, for a two wheeler with a right foot rear brake pedal.

If you’re on an automatic scooter with a left hand rear brake lever, this situation is not a problem. It also surprises me that Honda didn’t put the rear brake up on the left hand on NC DCT models. That would allow both feet to be free. At least one of our members, Wedders, has done that modification.
 

OldBoots

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I ended up keeping one finger in the throttle with the thumb, and three on the brake to stop rolling back. That is counter intuitive but it works.
 

Oldbear

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I’ve always just put the left foot down, regardless of what turn I was making. Hold with the rear brake, release it as you roll on the wick and engage the clutch. The ONLY time I put the right foot down is (1) it’s impossible because of terrain to touch with the left foot, or (2) at a stop where I’m just wanting to trench my legs with both feet on the deck. If I do the latter on a hill, I’ll hold the bike with the front bike. Dont do it often, but it’s not hard. Be Very careful using the front brake at low speeds when you’re turning (or you’ll get the practice picking up your bike).
 

OldBoots

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After a few weeks I have learned that some of the advice from the MSF is much more conditional than they portray. Doing the throttle and brake is too much for one hand to do reliably.
 

TheIronWarrior

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I’ve always just put the left foot down, regardless of what turn I was making. Hold with the rear brake, release it as you roll on the wick and engage the clutch. The ONLY time I put the right foot down is (1) it’s impossible because of terrain to touch with the left foot, or (2) at a stop where I’m just wanting to trench my legs with both feet on the deck. If I do the latter on a hill, I’ll hold the bike with the front bike. Dont do it often, but it’s not hard. Be Very careful using the front brake at low speeds when you’re turning (or you’ll get the practice picking up your bike).
Same here, always left so I can hold brake with the right. I've never had problems with tight right turns from a stop. I haven't tried every right turn in the world, so it's possible there are some out there that are much more challenging than I've seen though.
I will switch legs to shift into N if the stop is prolonged and I need to uncramp my clutch hand, but always switch back to the left foot to start rolling.
 
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