Rounded off oil drain plug bolt, anyone know where I can get new one?

MZ5

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I have two 3/8” torque wrenches. One is a click-type and one is a beam-type. They result in WILDLY different results on nuts and bolts, in terms of how tight they are.

Small bolts such as those that hold the plastics on our bikes will vibrate loose and fall out within days when I use the click-type wrench. That doesn’t happen with the beam-type wrench. I have thought a time or two the beam wrench puts a bit too much tension on those very low-tension bolts.

The point is that having a torque wrench gives little or no more assurance of correct fastener tension than using feel for many common applications (assuming one has some experience), AND ALSO that many common bolts have a wide range of acceptable tension. In fact, I’ve seen a published article on the topic which showed exactly that, but I can’t lay hands on it at the moment.
 

670cc

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I have two 3/8” torque wrenches. One is a click-type and one is a beam-type. They result in WILDLY different results on nuts and bolts, in terms of how tight they are.

Small bolts such as those that hold the plastics on our bikes will vibrate loose and fall out within days when I use the click-type wrench. That doesn’t happen with the beam-type wrench. I have thought a time or two the beam wrench puts a bit too much tension on those very low-tension bolts.

The point is that having a torque wrench gives little or no more assurance of correct fastener tension than using feel for many common applications (assuming one has some experience), AND ALSO that many common bolts have a wide range of acceptable tension. In fact, I’ve seen a published article on the topic which showed exactly that, but I can’t lay hands on it at the moment.
Just because your torque wrenches are unreliable doesn’t mean using a torque wrench is a bad practice. If you have two clocks that don’t keep the same time, one or both of them is no good. If your torque wrenches do not yield the same resulting bolt torque settings, one or both is bad. Get new torque wrenches.

In my former work career, I carried, in my van, calibrated torque wrenches at all times to do the job. The wrenches had calibration certificates and they were re-verified annually. The wrenches I use now in personal life are not calibrated annually, but I do know they were right when I got them. There are services available to have your torque wrench calibration verified.
 

showkey

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Oil changes are not rocket science .........but:
The automotive oil change business is plagued to complaints of stripped oil drain plugs or loose plugs that leak or fall out. (Unfortunately for them the last guy to touch the plug get blamed for the stopped threads.)

As customer would you choose a shop what used a torque wrench and double checked the drain plug ........or the tighten enough lube tech.

The NC a forum is a small community yet there are at least 10 prior posts on stripped threads or stripped nut on the drain plug........so maybe it’s not that simple for all.
 

RubyRider

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Oil changes are not rocket science .........but:
The automotive oil change business is plagued to complaints of stripped oil drain plugs or loose plugs that leak or fall out. (Unfortunately for them the last guy to touch the plug get blamed for the stopped threads.)

As customer would you choose a shop what used a torque wrench and double checked the drain plug ........or the tighten enough lube tech.

The NC a forum is a small community yet there are at least 10 prior posts on stripped threads or stripped nut on the drain plug........so maybe it’s not that simple for all.
If it's a good shop, you wouldn't know the difference.
 

MZ5

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Just because your torque wrenches are unreliable doesn’t mean using a torque wrench is a bad practice. If you have two clocks that don’t keep the same time, one or both of them is no good. If your torque wrenches do not yield the same resulting bolt torque settings, one or both is bad. Get new torque wrenches.

A similar principle applies to your arm (just because your 'touch' is unreliable, doesn't mean touch is unreliable).

To your admonition to "get new torque wrenches:" The situation of departing fasteners is exactly _why_ I have two 3/8" drive torque wrenches, but that gave me _different_ results rather than _better_ results. Torque wrenches simply don't stand out for precision as a class of tool, nor for accuracy as individual units, as both experience and the article I can't find the link to show.
 

Madison Sully

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A similar principle applies to your arm (just because your 'touch' is unreliable, doesn't mean touch is unreliable).

To your admonition to "get new torque wrenches:" The situation of departing fasteners is exactly _why_ I have two 3/8" drive torque wrenches, but that gave me _different_ results rather than _better_ results. Torque wrenches simply don't stand out for precision as a class of tool, nor for accuracy as individual units, as both experience and the article I can't find the link to show.
To be fair, it's not the wrench, it's the system. Dry threads vs. lubricated, operator error (anyone go past the click, or "double click"?), clean vs. some corrosion, etc. Just get it tight enough and stop. ;)
 

frog13

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Agreed. A really good repair or service person knows how to cover their mistakes so no one knows they screwed up.
Yeah, I've been done that way by a"professional " before. Didn't find the error until a couple of months had past......never went back. I'd say it is a good idea to have ones torque wrench (es) recalbrated from time to time.....especially click or digital types. Also use the proper poundage "span" on a torque wrench. Trying to get an accurate torque, say for 30 foot pounds using a torque wrench that goes up to 150 foot pounds , more than likely will not deliver a positive result. Now, if you had a torque wrench that went up to just 60 foot pounds, then your attempt for an accurate 30 foot pound application will occur. Ride on
 

itsmenc700

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Well I would expect a car repair place to use a torque wrench since there are so many different vehicles they could work on.
A quick lube place might not use one.
Solution - do it yourself!
I have never had anyone change my oil in my 40 plus years of driving and 30 plus years of riding.
AND I use my "calibrated arm" to tighten the bolts. Never stripped one or had one leak. Snug enough that's it. DONT CRANK on it!
AS to having two torque wrenches that arent the same.
JUST because you bought new wrenches doesnt mean they are calibrated correctly.
Two calibrated wrenches WILL both give the same torque value. Its that simple.
 

GregC

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The dealership was the one that torqued my oil drain plug to where I had to use bolt extractors to get it out. I've never had that happen in 45 years of vehicles doing my own oil changes, having dealers do it, and have quickie oil change shops do it. So having the "pro's" do it is certainly no guarantee of quality -- and with the oil plug you don't know you have a problem until the next oil change.

And, candidly, it's the same with oil filters, and I don't know a "shop" that does not over tighten the filter. Every. Single. Time.
 

GregC

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or in my case, it was in for its 16K service (still under warranty), I didn't have the oil and parts, so I just told them to do it. Convenience that turned into hell at the next change. Other than that one, I've done all mine (and that dealer will never see my bike again).
 
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