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Setting off in 2nd gear

spads25

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Will leaving from a stop in 2nd gear instead of 1st cause any long term damage? I did tonight just to see if it could and the engine didn’t seem to lug or bog.
 

670cc

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Depending on your method of take-off, it could theoretically wear the clutch a little more, or not. Otherwise it would not cause any harm.

To me, the NC stock gearing ratios are very good. But on other bikes I’ve owned that were geared too low, I had been known to start off in second gear when conditions justified it.
 
D

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I start a lot in second, even with the 17-tooth countersprocket I've used for quite awhile. I guess I'd be a little worried about it if the NC engine had twice the power ; }

I'm also sure my WR250R clutch when being used off-road gets a lot more challenge than the NC clutch ever does.
 

showkey

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There was a documented “case“ where a novice rider was confused on the shift pattern.
The rider thought one down was reverse.......so they started out in second gear, the clutch was toasted in less than 1000 miles.
Starting in second was the issue...........excessive slipping of the clutch was the cause and poor technique.
The first clutch was warrantied.............the second clutch was not and the root cause found on careful observation of the riders habits.

edit.......it’s all about technique if you were to start in second.
 
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D

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About 40,000 on my NC now, often starting out in 2nd. Same starts with the WR250R (use first/granny gear a lot on that bike too, offroad), at around 25,000. I guess it comes down to finesse or luck?

EDIT: guess I shouldn't recommend the practice to anyone because of this?
 
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Afan

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very little, if any advantage or benefits...................so you probably should not.
I'm not going to do that, for sure. 1st is made for that, for reason. Never did it with my car, nor my bike...
But, just wondering, why...
:D
 
D

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Anyone who doesn't know how or why should avoid it.
 

lootzyan

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And... What's the advantage of starting in 2nd? Why should I do that? :oops:
In the case of four-wheeled vehicles with manual gear shifting, starting from a higher gear makes sense, if it is done correctly, only if the tires have low road surface grip (snow, black ice, etc). This allows for better steering control at vehicle start, especially for vehicles with rear-wheel drive.
Would it make any sense for motorbikes? I really don't see it.
 

spads25

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Not lazy at all.

1) Legitimately curious, so I asked a question.
2) It helps get up to speed faster...and you can save your "well the NC never claimed to be fast" comments :rolleyes:
 

ld_rider

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And... What's the advantage of starting in 2nd? Why should I do that? :oops:
By starting in second gear you effectively change the torque multiplier compared to first gear. For example; If you are stopped in some sketchy dirt or gravel and need traction (say, starting at the bottom of a hill) the torque in second gear will be less than in first gear (assuming similar throttle applications). That might enable you to get going rather than just sitting spinning your rear tire in first gear as the tire fights to gain traction due to the higher torque that first gear normally provides.

A controlled throttle hand working in unison with a sensitive clutch hand makes the practice moot for most riders.

Also, a few of the luxury behemoth motorcycles have super low first gears to get all that mass (rider/passenger/kitchen sink/ and more) moving. When traveling light and solo, that granny first gear can be a pain in heavy stop and go traffic so leaving a 1.8 liter 6 cylinder motorcycle in second gear to start off will keep you from a second gear upshift every 30 feet when you have to stop again.
 

TacomaJD

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This would be questionable due to the simple physics: when is the overcoming of inertia easier and the transfer of power greater? In first or second gear?

I'd wager I could leave harder in first and change into 2nd and 3rd almost seamlessly and quicker than I could get to 3rd leaving out in 2nd and waiting on the torque to ramp up. So I'd say the statement that leaving out in 2nd gets you up to speed faster would be false.
 

Afan

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In the case of four-wheeled vehicles with manual gear shifting, starting from a higher gear makes sense, if it is done correctly, only if the tires have low road surface grip (snow, black ice, etc). This allows for better steering control at vehicle start, especially for vehicles with rear-wheel drive.
Would it make any sense for motorbikes? I really don't see it.
I totally understand your point and, as the manual transmission car owner, use this login having higher gear than it should be. Although, I don't know if this is Camry thing or all cars can do it, even on snow you can start in first barely touching gas pedal and then the next moment let it go. My car will start moving, getting faster, and and in a couple seconds enough movement to upshift to 2nd gear.
But, as I said, understand the logic - if specific circumstances...
 
D

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So you always do first-gear starts at downhill intersections? There are other scenarios when someone might feel they are not committing clutch abuse of course, and this is just one ; }
 

Afan

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By starting in second gear you effectively change the torque multiplier compared to first gear. For example; If you are stopped in some sketchy dirt or gravel and need traction (say, starting at the bottom of a hill) the torque in second gear will be less than in first gear (assuming similar throttle applications). That might enable you to get going rather than just sitting spinning your rear tire in first gear as the tire fights to gain traction due to the higher torque that first gear normally provides.

A controlled throttle hand working in unison with a sensitive clutch hand makes the practice moot for most riders.

Also, a few of the luxury behemoth motorcycles have super low first gears to get all that mass (rider/passenger/kitchen sink/ and more) moving. When traveling light and solo, that granny first gear can be a pain in heavy stop and go traffic so leaving a 1.8 liter 6 cylinder motorcycle in second gear to start off will keep you from a second gear upshift every 30 feet when you have to stop again.
Ok. Now I get it. And, yes, it does make a sense. Just never thought about it, as DCT owner. Although, I think I used the trick often in heavy traffic on my ST1100. :D
 
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