Question Shinko 705 Tire Pressure

SlimDude

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Hey Shinko 705 users, what do you recommend for tire pressures? My manual says 36/42 psi (front/rear) for stock tires for my 2012 700XA. Is that what you're using?
 

Makingitwork6999

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27 to 28 PSI should keep the wear patch wide and grippy for a bare naked nc700. As pressure approaches 30, many adventure tires get unreasonably slippery. When loaded down or riding double, 32 or higher may be right for you.

Got my tire from the dealer at 40psi. The tire spun the first time i pulled from a stop. We had a chat with the tech about that. Just a wee bit on the high side.
 

TacomaJD

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27 to 28 PSI should keep the wear patch wide and grippy for a bare naked nc700. As pressure approaches 30, many adventure tires get unreasonably slippery. When loaded down or riding double, 32 or higher may be right for you.

Got my tire from the dealer at 40psi. The tire spun the first time i pulled from a stop. We had a chat with the tech about that. Just a wee bit on the high side.
If it was a new tire, it likely spun because you haven't worn the mold release off of the tire....as happens with any new tire.
 

the Ferret

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Tacoma fyi hardly anyone uses the mold release anymore. Maybe Shinko I don't know, but most of the majors like Dunlop Bridgestone Michelin etc do not.
 

TacomaJD

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Tacoma fyi hardly anyone uses the mold release anymore. Maybe Shinko I don't know, but most of the majors like Dunlop Bridgestone Michelin etc do not.
Funny I installed a brand new Dunlop Q3 on the rear of my street NC the other day and when I was turning it around to pull out of the shop, I gave it some throttle to ease forward, the DCT engaged and the rear tire spun and I literally almost let it slip out from under me. Now that I've ridden 500+ miles on that tire, I assure you it would not spin nowhere near that easily on my concrete shop floor. Something is on new tires, regardless. Everyone knows to take it easy on new tires until the "new" wears off, whatever the "new" may be.

Makingitwork blamed 40 psi for his rear tire spinning leaving the stop sign......on an NC. Not a literbike. I don't see 40 psi being to blame at all for spinning a tire on a NC from leaving a stop sign, even getting on the gas hard. Unless it's a manual and he dumped the clutch leaving out dragrace style, that is...
 

the Ferret

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Funny I installed a brand new Dunlop Q3 on the rear of my street NC the other day and when I was turning it around to pull out of the shop, I gave it some throttle to ease forward, the DCT engaged and the rear tire spun and I literally almost let it slip out from under me. Now that I've ridden 500+ miles on that tire, I assure you it would not spin nowhere near that easily on my concrete shop floor. Something is on new tires, regardless. Everyone knows to take it easy on new tires until the "new" wears off, whatever the "new" may be.

Makingitwork blamed 40 psi for his rear tire spinning leaving the stop sign......on an NC. Not a literbike. I don't see 40 psi being to blame at all for spinning a tire on a NC from leaving a stop sign, even getting on the gas hard. Unless it's a manual and he dumped the clutch leaving out dragrace style, that is...
they do have oils in the rubber that seep to the surface when warmed up that need to be scrubbed off but they no longer use a mold release on the tread part of the tire, only on the sidewalls.


Yea, I seriously doubt if tire pressure was the cause of the slippage, but unlikely it was a mold release agent since they are rarely used anymore. * edit I was wrong above apparently Michelin still does*

as posted by mzflorida copied from the Adv forum in this thread


Dunlop:
Thank you for taking the time to contact us with your Dunlop motorcycle tire questions. Dunlop Motorcycle Tire does NOT use a "mold releasing agent" during the production of our tires. When new tires are fitted, they should not be subjected to maximum power, abrupt lean-over or hard cornering until a reasonable run-in distance of approximately 100 miles has been covered. This will permit the rider to become accustomed to the feel of the new tires or tire combination, find the edge, and achieve optimum road grip for a range of speeds, acceleration and handling use.

Be sure to check and adjust inflation pressure to recommended levels after the tire cools for at least three (3) hours following run-in. Remember, new tires will have a very different contact patch and lean-over edge. New tires, mixing a new tire with an used tire, and mixing tread pattern
combinations require careful ride evaluations.
Pirelli:
Hello

Pirelli does not use mold release. Tires are shiny because the general buying public demands that visually a tire look cool, smooth, shiny, and new when they shop for tires in the rack at the dealer. We rely on the smoothness of the mold to get this appearance and to help the tire let go from the mold during production.

I like to say tires are like new shoes, MX boots, or a leather jacket as they need the proper break in time. Regarding getting heat into tires this follows the same idea, only time and friction will put the heat in. I have attached a copy of the brochure so you can read about break in suggestions in the technical area. Ride safe

US Pirelli Moto
Click to expand...
Additional quote from Pirelli management:
First off, Knoche quickly dispatched the old wives' tale that the surface of the tire needs to be scuffed or roughed up to offer grip. "Maybe it's coming from the old days when people were spraying mold release on the tread when the molds were maybe not that precise," Knoche speculates, "and the machinery was not that precise. But nowadays molds are typically coated with Teflon or other surface treatments. The release you put in there (in the sidewall area only, not the tread) is for like baking a cake, you know, so that it fills all the little corners and today that is done more mechanically than by spraying. The sidewall is important because you have all the engraving in the sidewall [with tire size, inflation pressure and certifications] and that you want to look nicely on your tire, so that's why we still spray the mold release there."
Michelin's response indicates that they do indeed use an agent although I have never experienced this 'catastrophic grease' when riding away on a brand new Michelin
Thank you for your email. We appreciate the opportunity to serve you.

Concerning your question, Michelin has a mold release agent on all motorcycle tires. This will cause the tire to be slippery in the first few miles, but that goes away after the tire is scrubbed in. This normally occurs in the first 25-50 miles or so. Until then, the rider should use caution in riding the tire at accelerated speeds. Michelin always recommends obeying the speed limits and using care whenever riding.

If your questions have not been answered to your satisfaction, please call
Continental:
TractionSkin provides an extremely safe and short tire break in. This is possible due to the revolutionary raw tread surface, which is the result of a new mold coating technology which eliminates the need for tire-release agents.
 

Makingitwork6999

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One thing you should do on a new tire is scuff it. Ride carefully until you get a good scuff on the tire. Not sure how to do that? Try a little rough sandpaper on the center of the tire where it meets the road.

I have a different solution. I find a good dirt road and wobble the bike for a while. This takes the shine off the tire and nearly doubles the grip it has on asphalt or concrete

Do not be silly and spin the tire up on dry pavement. This leaves grooves in the tire. You can also overheat the tread.

A good scuffed tire can be used to hug the curves and improve the fun.

Do not try to drag a foot peg on a new tire. You are only asking for a crash.
 

Makingitwork6999

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If it was a new tire, it likely spun because you haven't worn the mold release off of the tire....as happens with any new tire.
I talk to a lot of tire people. Tire release chemical or not... ride safely on a new tire. Dull the surface first. Put some miles on it. Tilt and tip the bike in a straight line. These are simple but effective practices.

If you are not sure about tire release, please lick your tire. If it tastes like lemon and peanut butter, there is tire release on it. ...
...
...
...
...
kidding!!! Did you lick your tire before scrolling further? Shame on you. What did it taste like??
 
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Makingitwork6999

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The manual and swingarm measurements are for tires from the factory;
Per Shinko Website: 41 is the max tire pressure (to be used for max loads)
View attachment 45098... and i get upset every time someone puts 40 pounds of pressure in my tires. I use 40 pounds in my car tires for drifting. Your experience with your tire pressure is very subjective

Max Load may be a good Tinder name. It is not always a good setting for anything.

I have very fine-tuned senses for balance at speed. When a tire is over inflated, it can transfer mold imperfections straight to your hips and spine. It may outright wobble or hop strangely. So, if you want to have the same level of comfort as Fred Flinstone, be my guest. 40 lbs it is.

If you are not sure what i am talking about, inflate your tire then put your bike on the center stand. Put the tire in gear. Watch it spin. Maybe allow your hand to slide over the tread. Feel the imperfections? If your suspension is firm or sticky, these ups and downs and wobbles go straight into your torso.

Over time, you will start to ache.

So, learn what tire pressure is best for you. Take a tire pressure test day and bring a pressure gauge. Never run a tire below 15 to 17 pounds on the street. Bad things happen.

Warning!!! This sign is to inform you that the elevator you are in is set to Max Load. After selecting your floor... hold on tight.

I owned a Can Am Spyder and had problems with tires that last two weeks. The center strip always wore off. Eventually i figured out that there is no good tire pressure for the stock Kenda tire on a spyder. The tire always deformed at speed. I replaced the rear with a car tire. Problem solved. 50 times the mileage. Woof! That was a terrible thing to learn on your own.
 
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