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Slow bike fast

the Ferret

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If I'm going to change for HP and Torque, what you are suggesting is not enough. In just a few years, e-bikes with more power and torque than you suggest will have enough range for a spirited 120 mile ride loop from my house. That will be my next bike. Better than DCT for sure. Little to no maintenance. Plenty of power and torque.
Unless you want to ride more than 120 miles ( round trip) from your house.

I would have no issue with riding an electric bike, IF, range the goes up, the charging becomes fast and convenient, and the price comes down. I've test ridden a Zero S. But im not buying an electric bike that costs twice as much as an ICE bike, goes 120 miles round trip before coming to a stop dead, and requires overnight to charge once you have it towed back home...

Just read an article tonight on the Zero SR in Road Runner Magazine. Nice bike as electrics go. But not for $18K base for 120 miles of riding (apparently you can pay another $2k and download an additional 21 more miles range if I read it right...its kind of confusing ....they are starting to do a pay for play thing, where you buy a base bike then purchase additional range and power as needed/wanted thru an app on your phone and range and power are EXPENSIVE, or you can buy all the range and power up front by buying the premium model for $22K. Anyhow I'll be 72 next month and would be real suprised if the electrics " catch up" before I'm worm bait. Shame really. Not having to pay for gas would be nice. Then again I can buy a lot of of gas for $18 - $22k and ride as far from home as I want. Just being realistic.

I know 670cc has one, but I have to assume that he puts a lot more miles on his ICE bikes and that the electric bike is really more of a novelty for him. At any rate if he really wants to go anywhere, and not just play locally, at least at this point in time, he is forced to own multiple bikes, and let the electric sit in the garage. I have 2 trips coming up soon, one to Rhode Island via the east coast from Virginia with 2 buddies, and the other a trip to North Dakota via Wisconsin and Minnesota with 2 buddies and at this point I dont think either trip would be feasable in any way on an electric bike, and may not be for another decade or two.
 

Tas152

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So how many would be interested if Honda brought out an NC 850X manual and DCT (basically a bore upgrade), basically the same size/weight/features bike, with 80 hp and 65 # torque. (about the same as a Suzuki SV650) that included heated grips and cruise control as standard? Raise your hands.

I would
I would buy it for the cruise control alone. If the next NC750x manual has cc I will update to that just for the cc.
 

Tas152

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But aren't there some aftermarket CC's that work about as good?
I would only be interested in a Honda integrated warranted solution. The 2021 model has fly by wire throttle so it should be easy for Honda to offer cc as an optional accessory.
 

670cc

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I would have no issue with riding an electric bike, IF, range the goes up, the charging becomes fast and convenient, and the price comes down. I've test ridden a Zero S. But im not buying an electric bike that costs twice as much as an ICE bike, goes 120 miles round trip before coming to a stop dead, and requires overnight to charge once you have it towed back home...
If your Zero S quote was twice the price of an NC750X, you either found a highly discounted deal on the 750X, or the Zero dealer has a high markup over MSRP.
I know 670cc has one, but I have to assume that he puts a lot more miles on his ICE bikes and that the electric bike is really more of a novelty for him. At any rate if he really wants to go anywhere, and not just play locally, at least at this point in time, he is forced to own multiple bikes, and let the electric sit in the garage. I have 2 trips coming up soon, one to Rhode Island via the east coast from Virginia with 2 buddies, and the other a trip to North Dakota via Wisconsin and Minnesota with 2 buddies and at this point I dont think either trip would be feasable in any way on an electric bike, and may not be for another decade or two.
Five out of the seven powered 2-wheelers in our fleet are not really suitable for long distance trips; it’s not the electric motorcycle alone that fits in that category.

I see you ride almost daily and if I recall correctly, the rides are generally under 100 miles. It seems you could get along well with the range of an electric motorcycle, if you wanted one. Yes, in the present day, you would need another bike for your long distance rides. Had the building of electric charging infrastructure or battery swapping not been put off for so long, we might be in a different place today.
 

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To be honest when I first herd of a NC850 bike my mind started thinking more power, better suspension& brakes,larger fuel capacity and don,t get me started with Honda doing a Turbo on this engine. Then my passion faded to being honest with myself why I bought this new model in 2012. It is one of the perfect street bikes made. I was never a fan of twins of any type but this 270 deg. with some pulsations is very pleasing. The low end drive ability and moderate power is more than enough for a good ride. The low center of gravity and internal storage makes you wonder why others MFG,s do not copy. Honda got it right on this one. I think I,ll just lust over all the new models and dream of how nice they are while I go for another ride on this perfect street bike with its few limitations,just like the owner.
 

670cc

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To be honest when I first herd of a NC850 bike my mind started thinking more power, better suspension& brakes,larger fuel capacity and don,t get me started with Honda doing a Turbo on this engine. Then my passion faded to being honest with myself why I bought this new model in 2012. It is one of the perfect street bikes made. I was never a fan of twins of any type but this 270 deg. with some pulsations is very pleasing. The low end drive ability and moderate power is more than enough for a good ride. The low center of gravity and internal storage makes you wonder why others MFG,s do not copy. Honda got it right on this one. I think I,ll just lust over all the new models and dream of how nice they are while I go for another ride on this perfect street bike with its few limitations,just like the owner.
I like your way of thinking. When you try to give the NC more power, bigger bore, higher reving, etc, it simply becomes another bike like the majority already on the market. In my opinion, wishing for more, more, more defeats the purpose of the original New Concept design philosophy that made the NC unique.

If people want something larger or more powerful than the NC700/750, perhaps even with DCT, they can buy an Africa Twin engine based motorcycle.
 

the Ferret

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If your Zero S quote was twice the price of an NC750X, you either found a highly discounted deal on the 750X, or the Zero dealer has a high markup over MSRP.

Five out of the seven powered 2-wheelers in our fleet are not really suitable for long distance trips; it’s not the electric motorcycle alone that fits in that category.

I see you ride almost daily and if I recall correctly, the rides are generally under 100 miles. It seems you could get along well with the range of an electric motorcycle, if you wanted one. Yes, in the present day, you would need another bike for your long distance rides. Had the building of electric charging infrastructure or battery swapping not been put off for so long, we might be in a different place today.
While it's true the current range of an electric would fulfill the majority of my daily rides where I go out for an hour to two hours, on any given day in better weather my rides can go longer depending on mood, riding companion's if any etc. I cannot guarantee I will ride less than 100 miles. In fact in the summer, we will often go out and ride 200 miles or more after a Popeye's lunch. Weekend rides could be even longer. We often ride to Portsmouth Ohio for lunch at a place called The Scioto Ribber which is 123 miles one way, and then take the long curvy way home. Figure close to a 300 mile day.

I have considered buying a used Zero to dabble with, to dip my toe in the electric pond so to speak, but honestly it would just be spending money I don't need to spend, to cover a need that is already covered quite adequately by the NC. I would enjoy the Zero experience I'm sure as I like all kinds of motorcycles, but truthfully I just can't justify the cost for the experience. Been retired 9 years living on Social Security and my savings. My problem, not Zero's (well it is kind of Zero's problem if someone who is willing to ride one, since many motorcyclists aren't willing, but can't because of the initial buy in price)

As far as purchase price of an electric bike, I can only go by what I read in the magazines and on Zero's website. There are zero Zero (pun intended) dealers close to me, the closest being about 100 miles by freeway ...further by backroads, if that dealer is still carrying them. According to his website, which I just looked up, he is, but it also lists Triumph and I know he dropped them years ago. That's where I test rode the Zero S years ago. Buying one there I would be iffy just to make it home on a full charge. Certainly couldn't ride there for something, turn around and ride back home.

According to the article on the 2022 Zero SR for $2195 you can "unlock" another 17.3 kWh of battery power making the bike capable of an additional 21 miles (124 miles of mixed riding total)

BTW my only complaint about the Zero S I test rode was jarring suspension, and the ONLY complaint by the magazine tester of the 2022 Zero SR was.... jarring suspension lol or as they put it "lack of small bump c-c-c-compliance"
They listed the positives as "instant torque, no shifting, over-the-air performance upgrades, no gas required"

Yes it's a shame the electric infrastructure is not set up, but honestly, if I read it right (correct me if I'm wrong), even an 80% quick charge takes hours. (3-4 hours at 220V ...over night at 110 V).

I'm sure many of us are somewhat ignorant of the requirements of living with an electric, especially out on the road. If you are out and your gauge tells you, you are getting low, and you happen to find a quick charging station, how long do you have to wait while it charges? What happens if you are out riding and don't find a quick charging station? Does it just die like an electric shaver and you roll to a stop and need a tow? Can AAA come to you and do a boost charge? They never talk about this stuff in the magazine articles. Only about how fast and torquey they are to ride when charged.

I'm certainly not against electric bikes, but they have a ways to go before I am willing to go all in on one.

Test riding a Zero S
rzMIcQEh.jpg
 

670cc

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I have considered buying a used Zero to dabble with, to dip my toe in the electric pond so to speak, but honestly it would just be spending money I don't need to spend, to cover a need that is already covered quite adequately by the NC. I would enjoy the Zero experience I'm sure as I like all kinds of motorcycles, but truthfully I just can't justify the cost for the experience. Been retired 9 years living on Social Security and my savings. My problem, not Zero's (well it is kind of Zero's problem if someone who is willing to ride one, since many motorcyclists aren't willing, but can't because of the initial buy in price)
As for the Zero purchase price, it’s true of any discretionary spending, that financial means, perceived value of the product, or other factors dictates whether the purchase is worthwhile. For me, given the pleasure I derive from the Zero, it was good value and I have no regrets. I also felt that by supporting the electric motorcycle industry today, it will help improve tomorrow’s product and help make electric motorcycles to eventually be more affordable to more people.
According to the article on the 2022 Zero SR for $2195 you can "unlock" another 17.3 kWh of battery power making the bike capable of an additional 21 miles (124 miles of mixed riding total)
I know nothing of the article you mention, but it seems to be in error. If you could unlock 17.3 kWh of battery storage capacity for just $2195, that would be a real bargain, and it would increase the bike’s range by over 100 miles.
 

Bskicrash1

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While it's true the current range of an electric would fulfill the majority of my daily rides where I go out for an hour to two hours, on any given day in better weather my rides can go longer depending on mood, riding companion's if any etc. I cannot guarantee I will ride less than 100 miles. In fact in the summer, we will often go out and ride 200 miles or more after a Popeye's lunch. Weekend rides could be even longer. We often ride to Portsmouth Ohio for lunch at a place called The Scioto Ribber which is 123 miles one way, and then take the long curvy way home. Figure close to a 300 mile day.

I have considered buying a used Zero to dabble with, to dip my toe in the electric pond so to speak, but honestly it would just be spending money I don't need to spend, to cover a need that is already covered quite adequately by the NC. I would enjoy the Zero experience I'm sure as I like all kinds of motorcycles, but truthfully I just can't justify the cost for the experience. Been retired 9 years living on Social Security and my savings. My problem, not Zero's (well it is kind of Zero's problem if someone who is willing to ride one, since many motorcyclists aren't willing, but can't because of the initial buy in price)

As far as purchase price of an electric bike, I can only go by what I read in the magazines and on Zero's website. There are zero Zero (pun intended) dealers close to me, the closest being about 100 miles by freeway ...further by backroads, if that dealer is still carrying them. According to his website, which I just looked up, he is, but it also lists Triumph and I know he dropped them years ago. That's where I test rode the Zero S years ago. Buying one there I would be iffy just to make it home on a full charge. Certainly couldn't ride there for something, turn around and ride back home.

According to the article on the 2022 Zero SR for $2195 you can "unlock" another 17.3 kWh of battery power making the bike capable of an additional 21 miles (124 miles of mixed riding total)

BTW my only complaint about the Zero S I test rode was jarring suspension, and the ONLY complaint by the magazine tester of the 2022 Zero SR was.... jarring suspension lol or as they put it "lack of small bump c-c-c-compliance"
They listed the positives as "instant torque, no shifting, over-the-air performance upgrades, no gas required"

Yes it's a shame the electric infrastructure is not set up, but honestly, if I read it right (correct me if I'm wrong), even an 80% quick charge takes hours. (3-4 hours at 220V ...over night at 110 V).

I'm sure many of us are somewhat ignorant of the requirements of living with an electric, especially out on the road. If you are out and your gauge tells you, you are getting low, and you happen to find a quick charging station, how long do you have to wait while it charges? What happens if you are out riding and don't find a quick charging station? Does it just die like an electric shaver and you roll to a stop and need a tow? Can AAA come to you and do a boost charge? They never talk about this stuff in the magazine articles. Only about how fast and torquey they are to ride when charged.

I'm certainly not against electric bikes, but they have a ways to go before I am willing to go all in on one.

Test riding a Zero S
rzMIcQEh.jpg
At a quick glance, I thought you were on a Buell Blast! I like the concept and the look of the Zero brand of motorcycles.
 

the Ferret

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As for the Zero purchase price, it’s true of any discretionary spending, that financial means, perceived value of the product, or other factors dictates whether the purchase is worthwhile. For me, given the pleasure I derive from the Zero, it was good value and I have no regrets. I also felt that by supporting the electric motorcycle industry today, it will help improve tomorrow’s product and help make electric motorcycles to eventually be more affordable to more people.

I know nothing of the article you mention, but it seems to be in error. If you could unlock 17.3 kWh of battery storage capacity for just $2195, that would be a real bargain, and it would increase the bike’s range by over 100 miles.
No argument about the discretionary spending. We all make our own choices

Yea, on the unlocking of the power I don't know? Here it is verbatim from the article. Road Runner May/June 2022 article: 2022 Zero SR Pay-to Play UPGRADES by Geoff Drake page 57

" you can "unlock" another $17.3 kWh of battery power for $2195, making the bike capable of an additional 21 miles (124 miles of mixed riding total, or 187 miles in the city)."

It also says

"An additional battery, which the company calls a Power Tank, can be installed for $2895, occupying most of the storage compartment. Thus your range can be increased to 151 miles of mixed riding (227 miles city)."

these are on top of the $18,595 base price of the Zero SR motorcycle

Not an expert, just going by what I read. Trying to learn.
 

mzflorida

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I like your way of thinking. When you try to give the NC more power, bigger bore, higher reving, etc, it simply becomes another bike like the majority already on the market. In my opinion, wishing for more, more, more defeats the purpose of the original New Concept design philosophy that made the NC unique.

If people want something larger or more powerful than the NC700/750, perhaps even with DCT, they can buy an Africa Twin engine based motorcycle.
I was doing some comparing to other bikes as I was riding today. I’m very pleased with my return to the NC platform. I kept the reasons why I bought it front of mind during the process.
 

750dct

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I like your way of thinking. When you try to give the NC more power, bigger bore, higher reving, etc, it simply becomes another bike like the majority already on the market. In my opinion, wishing for more, more, more defeats the purpose of the original New Concept design philosophy that made the NC unique.

If people want something larger or more powerful than the NC700/750, perhaps even with DCT, they can buy an Africa Twin engine based motorcycle.
I agree, the "more, more, more" way of thinking just eliminates the integrity of the NC750 and now you are on to a totally other bike, and there are plenty to choose from already.
 

Fronnzy

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I agree, the "more, more, more" way of thinking just eliminates the integrity of the NC750 and now you are on to a totally other bike, and there are plenty to choose from already.
I agree also. Right now. Lol.

But if we are honest with ourselves, most of us could still rightly and practically be riding whichever bike we had 6 or 7 bikes ago. Which for me was either a well kitted DR650, or CB919 Hornet.

And those were also bikes I absolutely had to have, as they were exactly what I “needed,” and were great fun.

My wife doesn’t much believe me anymore when I say this [whatever thing I bought] is perfect and I’ll have it forever. No matter how convinced I’ve got myself. :)

But I do very much love my NC and imagine I’ll have it for a long time. Just out for a ride and having a blast. (Snack stop)
 
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