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Sticky Shift Lever

pdxer_2000

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I only have 1,000 miles on my nc700x and my foot gear shift lever has been getting more and more sticky over time (or not allowing me to down shift at all) at times when running around in-town speeds when downshifting. Up shifting seems fine. Sometimes I have to let out slightly on the clutch lever at times in order to be able down shift at all between 4th-1st gears. The one thing I noticed is that when I'm riding at steady faster speeds like 45mph + it's a perfectly clean downshift when coming to a stop and there's no problem. It's only when I'm doing in town riding for any length of time doing a lot of up/down shifting. Anyone else experiencing this? Any feedback would be appreciated. Thanks!
 

Hmcp88

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Can't say if experienced that at all. One good thing to do at services is remove the shifter (it's only 1 bolt) and clean and lube the bore where it pivots. I have seen and had a shifter stick because of dirt and grime in that channel.
 

CorEnFa

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I've had a few instances where the bike would get stuck in neutral. At first, from a stop, I could up shift to 2 then back down to 1 quickly, but that's starting to not work too. I have to stomp on the shift lever to get it down to 1. My 600 mile service is this week. I'm going to have them give it a look. Anything I learn, I'll post back.
 

670cc

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I've had a few instances where the bike would get stuck in neutral. At first, from a stop, I could up shift to 2 then back down to 1 quickly, but that's starting to not work too. I have to stomp on the shift lever to get it down to 1. My 600 mile service is this week. I'm going to have them give it a look. Anything I learn, I'll post back.

Sorry if you already know this but here's a tip:

Assuming the engine is running when you have this problem: At a stop with the clutch disengaged, neither transmission shaft is spinning, so the gear dogs may not align. Instead of stomping on the lever, let the clutch lever out just slightly while pressing down with normal pressure on the shift lever. The transmission main shaft should rotate enough for the dogs to align and it should shift.

In the case of the engine being off, you roll the bike fore or aft a bit to spin the countershaft to accomplish the same thing.

Stomping on the shifter can bend the shifter forks.

Greg
 
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HONDABIKEPRO

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remember any time you move the shift lever, up or down you must, release the lever complelty, if your foot touches the lever at all it will not return to the centered position on the shift drum, making it not shift to the next gear, and never use more then light foot pressure on the lever. it can get very expensive if you stomp on the lever and bend a shift fork, and always pull the clutch lever to the grip when shifting, if not you could cause some missed shifts. dale
 

pdxer_2000

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Thanks for the feedback - the clutch lever area is super clean because it's virtually a brand new bike and the only solution that's ever worked when it's stuck is to either upshift and then try the downshift again or let the clutch lever out slightly, try again, then it goes right into gear. Frustrating to have to do that at times while in traffic at slower speeds. Allowing the bike to roll with the clutch lever in makes no difference and taking your foot off of the shift lever completely between gears while downshifting doesn't make any difference as well. I never force it as well. It's a bummer because I've had a number of sportbikes/sport touring bikes and this is the only one that's had issues with sticking while downshifting. Again like I mentioned, if I'm decelerating from riding at 45-55mph +, and having to downshift, it works correctly and easy.
 

CorEnFa

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It's easy to say don't stomp on it and I'm quite familiar with how it works. But when there is no way to get the bike in gear and you're at a busy intersection, you do what you have to do and deal with potential consequences later. Sorry, that's just the way it is.

This is an issue that has scared me more than once on this bike but never before on any of the other bikes I've ridden. The bike, when it sticks, simply won't get out of neutral.
 

pdxer_2000

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... Thanks CorEnFa, good to know I'm not the only one experiencing this problem.

This is an issue that has scared me more than once on this bike but never before on any of the other bikes I've ridden. The bike, when it sticks, simply won't get out of neutral.
 

670cc

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It's easy to say don't stomp on it and I'm quite familiar with how it works. But when there is no way to get the bike in gear and you're at a busy intersection, you do what you have to do and deal with potential consequences later. Sorry, that's just the way it is.

This is an issue that has scared me more than once on this bike but never before on any of the other bikes I've ridden. The bike, when it sticks, simply won't get out of neutral.

I'm not saying your bike does or doesn't have a problem, but it may help to not use neutral at a stop, if you intentionally are. Again, I'm just trying to be helpful here. The only time I use neutral on my NC700X is to roll it around the garage with the engine off. Most motorcycle safety instructions will say to keep the bike in gear while waiting at an intersection. You are then always ready to go when you need to. I shift down to first just before the stop. I never, ever put a bike in neutral in traffic. If you think the clutch might wear significantly more if you are holding it in a lot, that's just not the case.

Greg
 

CorEnFa

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Greg -
I'm not using neutral at the stop lights. It won't shift past neutral into 1. It stops at neutral and won't go past it. Then I can't get it out of neutral. It doesn't happen often, but when it does happen it's very nerve wracking.
 

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Most motorcycle safety instructions will say to keep the bike in gear while waiting at an intersection. You are then always ready to go when you need to. I shift down to first just before the stop. I never, ever put a bike in neutral in traffic. If you think the clutch might wear significantly more if you are holding it in a lot, that's just not the case.

Greg

That is not the case in the UK where leaving a car/bike in gear is considered bad practice though there are a number of people who do. I personally consider that when I see someone driving like that in the UK they are lazy. However, I can see where this practise comes from in the USA because the vast majority of cars are autos whereas as in Europe most people prefer geared cars. It takes less than a second to put your bike in gear and away you go.
The above post is not meant to cause offence to anyone. I can see why the different lines of thought on driving procedure has come about because of the large amount of auto cars in the USA and the habit of just putting your foot down.
 
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Rocker66

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That is not the case in the UK where leaving a car/bike in gear is considered bad practice though there are a number of people who do. I personally consider that when I see someone driving like that in the UK they are lazy. However, I can see where this practise comes from in the USA because the vast majority of cars are autos whereas as in Europe most people prefer geared cars. It takes less than a second to put your bike in gear and away you go.
The above post is not meant to cause offence to anyone. I can see why the different lines of thought on driving procedure has come about because of the large amount of auto cars in the USA and the habit of just putting your foot down.

I agree completely
 

670cc

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Greg -
I'm not using neutral at the stop lights. It won't shift past neutral into 1. It stops at neutral and won't go past it. Then I can't get it out of neutral. It doesn't happen often, but when it does happen it's very nerve wracking.

That definitely sounds like a mechanical problem. Usually neutral is elusive, even when you want it. I hope the warranty service can clear things up. If anything, the problem may go away when the transmission wears in. Good luck.

Greg
 

670cc

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That is not the case in the UK where leaving a car/bike in gear is considered bad practice though there are a number of people who do. I personally consider that when I see someone driving like that in the UK they are lazy. However, I can see where this practise comes from in the USA because the vast majority of cars are autos whereas as in Europe most people prefer geared cars. It takes less than a second to put your bike in gear and away you go.
The above post is not meant to cause offence to anyone. I can see why the different lines of thought on driving procedure has come about because of the large amount of auto cars in the USA and the habit of just putting your foot down.

I agree that customs are different here and there. One question comes to mind, though. In the UK, if you have a DCT model, would you need to press the neutral button every time you stop for a traffic light, then press the D or S button when it's safe to go? Just wondered how that would apply.
 
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Rocker66

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No when I had my VFR1200DCT I would just roll to a stop in D and open the throttle when I wanted to go which seemed very strange at first. As Wozza says this is because it's an automatic and most Brits are taught to ride and drive manuals
 

johnakay

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wat da fook am I on about here..just woke from a kip and re-read this.
me think its time I went to da bed.




also bare in mind that there are two types of licences for car and bike.
pass your test in a geared car ,you can also drive an automatic.
if you pass your test in an Auto ,you cannot drive a geared car on the same licence.
pass....geared bike you can ride an auto being a bike or scooter.
pass... on an Auto bike or scooter you cannot ride a geared bike.
 
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happy

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I agree that customs are different here and there. One question comes to mind, though. In the UK, if you have a DCT model, would you need to press the neutral button every time you stop for a traffic light, then press the D or S button when it's safe to go? Just wondered how that would apply.

That is not the case in the UK where leaving a car/bike in gear is considered bad practice though there are a number of people who do. I personally consider that when I see someone driving like that in the UK they are lazy. However, I can see where this practise comes from in the USA because the vast majority of cars are autos whereas as in Europe most people prefer geared cars. It takes less than a second to put your bike in gear and away you go.
The above post is not meant to cause offence to anyone. I can see why the different lines of thought on driving procedure has come about because of the large amount of auto cars in the USA and the habit of just putting your foot down.

also bare in mind that there are two types of licences for car and bike.
pass your test in a geared car ,you can also drive an automatic.
if you pass your test in an Auto ,you cannot drive a geared car on the same licence.
pass....geared bike you can ride an auto being a bike or scooter.
pass... on an Auto bike or scooter you cannot ride a geared bike.

Personally I do not make it a mandatory thing leaving my vehicle in neutral or in 1st gear at a stop position. It all depends on my mood and the traffic conditions. I never cruise to a stop on Neutral.

However I believe it is due to SAFETY issues when the official instruction is to leave it in 1st gear (manual or automatic transmission).

Some possible reasons:
It is quicker to roll off when the light turns green (no hesitation at all).

It is also safer to be engaged in gear, in case some other vehicle plows into the vehicle and this prevents the vehicle from rolling along (chain collision). The engine may cut off but the gears are locked.

On a slope, this is even more critical because in Neutral, the control of the vehicle is less.

I hope these points make sense.
:p
 
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