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Stopping at a light? You're probably doing it wrong.

Gixus

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So like use the kill switch or not to stop the engine, loud pipes, loud horn, is the dress blue or white - this is right there as well.
WHO cares!?
WE all are different.
We will not agree on much.
Let's ri
As I didn’t watch the video, what is the logic for using the rear brake instead of the front for illuminating the brake light? It seems illogical to me.
Maybe you should watch the video, and then you wouldn’t be asking questions that you could answer for yourself. You seem a logical guy, so why don’t you avail yourself of obtaining the information from the video, and then you’ll be able to ask informed questions. I’m not being confrontational, just forthright, just like you have been in posts of yours I’ve read.
 

bigbird

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I I don’t personally keep my bike in gear at red lights because I wasn’t taught that and it makes sense to me. It also burns out the thrust bearing on a manual clutch. On the other hand if I rode a DCT, I’d likely leave it in gear, but cover the rear brake.
I haven’t looked in my service manual, but I ask wouldnt DCT’s clutches use the same thrust bearing as well?
It’s my understanding that the clutches are similar in design to the manual versions in operation, the only difference being that the engagement/disengagement is controlled by the ECM commanding stepper motors and or solenoids to control hydraulic pressure to do the work that a clutch cable would do,
 

dduelin

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I haven’t looked in my service manual, but I ask wouldnt DCT’s clutches use the same thrust bearing as well?
It’s my understanding that the clutches are similar in design to the manual versions in operation, the only difference being that the engagement/disengagement is controlled by the ECM commanding stepper motors and or solenoids to control hydraulic pressure to do the work that a clutch cable would do,
I’d have to look it up but I’m pretty sure just oil pressure holds the clutch packs engaged which is kind of reversed from a manual clutch that is held disengaged. Solenoids and valves control the direction of oil pressure to the correct pack.There is a clutch lift bearing on a manual NC but for the life of me in 50+ years of being around motorcycles I’ve never heard of wearing out the thrust or lift bearing on any wet clutch bike.
 
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http404

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Don’t worry about it. Its just the state of the western world with its uptight political correctness. It appears impossible not to offend someone these days no matter what you say. I’m offended that that you even think that you need to say that you think you’ve “stepped in it.” Please supply apology immediately. . (A win

Don’t worry about it. Its just the state of the western world with its uptight political correctness. It appears impossible not to offend someone these days no matter what you say. I’m offended that that you even think that you need to say that you think you’ve “stepped in it.” Please supply apology immediately. . (A wink smiley)
(Al Pacino voice) I hold myself in contempt!
 

670cc

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I’d have to look it up but I’m pretty sure just oil pressure holds the clutch packs engaged which is kind of reversed from a manual clutch that is held disengaged. Solenoids and valves control the direction of oil pressure to the correct pack.There is a clutch lift bearing on a manual NC but for the life of me in 50+ years of being around motorcycles I’ve never heard of wearing out the thrust or lift bearing on any wet clutch bike.
Right. The NC manual clutch lift bearing is well oiled and should be as reliable as any other bearing inside the crankcase/transmission case. Like you, I have never heard of the clutch bearing wearing out.

The bearing, I believe item 24, costs $14.
A73F27BB-4478-4A4C-8314-70156233CFD9.jpeg
 
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AVG1940

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This topic is another grenade rolled into a crowded room type deal.
I fully understand personal pref. Gear in, gear out is a topic more on collision avoidance than simple component wear or ambiguous choice.

Firstly, some chance of collision avoidance is better than no chance. Clutch in, in gear, clean foot down, a constant scan, and most importantly an escape route. Period. Whether you are trained well enough (and practice) to react is all up to you.

Secondly, though it may be true that accident stats on motorcycle rear-enders is kinda rare, (actually, no less than cars. A huge number of car rear-enders are never reported), injury stats on that type of hit is not. You will likely be injured. A 15 MPH rear-ender in your F-150 is an annoyance. On your scoot, it can be a debilitating if not life altering event. This is not to mention a 35-45 mph impact.

Lastly, the best way to avoid being smacked at a light is not gear in or out. It is to not be in the kill zone. If one day states realize filtering saves lives, and riders safely practice it, discussing gear in-out technics in stopped traffic, between vehicles will be a relatively moot point.
 

trickytryaler

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I have a DCT model and I leave it in gear with space to move out of the way if needed. That split millisecond to put it in gear may be the time needed to move out of the way. Front brake is also covered and if I'm hit from the rear and didn't see it coming, in or out of gear, front brake or no front brake won't make a bit of difference. But do what you want. I prefer my options.
 

itsmenc700

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"Lastly, the best way to avoid being smacked at a light is not gear in or out. It is to not be in the kill zone. If one day states realize filtering saves lives, and riders safely practice it, discussing gear in-out technics in stopped traffic, between vehicles will be a relatively moot point."

While I understand your point and am not fully against it -
We can't get the zipper method down so that we dont come to a stop at a lane ending at a construction zone,
We have to slow down on the freeway in the left lane when the right lane has merging vehicle,
Have rush hour accidents on the freeway - ( sorry for the past 40 years I have not had one rush hour accident and dont understand them at all),
Roundabouts can cause people to loose their minds,
Everyone runs a yellow light now,

HOW will the masses react to a motorcycle pulling past them up to the stop line and getting in front of them JUST because they are a bike??
People pull guns and hit the workers at fast food joints for not getting their order correct!!
I just dont see it working very well.
 

the Ferret

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In order to shoot out from behind the car in front of you with any expedience at all, you'd have to be stopped on an angle behind the car in front of you. (and if you were stopped on an angle for an escape. wouldn't you have to turn your bars on an unusual angle to see the traffic not coming to a stop behind you causing further delay in accelerating and avoiding the car in front of you?) Then do you point to the left and maybe shoot out into oncoming traffic or into the side or back of the car in the next lane over on a multilane street or to the right and shoot out into a curb, guy wire or telephone pole or pedestrian?

As an observational point, I have never in 57 years of riding, observed a bike stopped in traffic angled enough for an easy escape.
 

670cc

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In order to shoot out from behind the car in front of you with any expedience at all, you'd have to be stopped on an angle behind the car in front of you. (and if you were stopped on an angle for an escape. wouldn't you have to turn your bars on an unusual angle to see the traffic not coming to a stop behind you causing further delay in accelerating and avoiding the car in front of you?) Then do you point to the left and maybe shoot out into oncoming traffic or into the side or back of the car in the next lane over on a multilane street or to the right and shoot out into a curb, guy wire or telephone pole or pedestrian?

As an observational point, I have never in 57 years of riding, observed a bike stopped in traffic angled enough for an easy escape.
Stopping at an angle would commit oneself to exiting in only one direction. Stopping straight but with sufficient maneuvering space between your bike and the vehicle ahead would perhaps allow two potential escape routes.

Honestly, I reduce the need to contemplate safety planning in these scenarios by not putting myself in these situations in the first place. As a general rule, I don’t ride in cities, nor in traffic. I live in the countryside, and typically ride in the countryside, on rural highways or in the forests. The county I live in has a total of two traffic lights. I do not commute, nor do I run errands on a bike, and have little need to be in a (dangerous) urban high traffic environment. The big city riding environment is too dangerous, in my opinion, and if I can avoid it, I do.
 

the Ferret

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Stopping at an angle would commit oneself to exiting in only one direction. Stopping straight but with sufficient maneuvering space between your bike and the vehicle ahead would perhaps allow two potential escape routes.

Honestly, I reduce the need to contemplate safety planning in these scenarios by not putting myself in these situations in the first place. As a general rule, I don’t ride in cities, nor in traffic. I live in the countryside, and typically ride in the countryside, on rural highways or in the forests. I do not commute, nor do I run errands on a bike, and have little need to be in a (dangerous) urban high traffic environment. The county I live in has a total of two traffic lights. The big city riding environment is too dangerous, in my opinion, and if I can avoid it, I do.

So, if stopped straight, you'd have to make a decision to go one direction or the other, which would take time to make that decision, then turning the bars in the direction of escape, and executing the escape without running into something yourself. I think talking about it is all well and good, but being able to actually do it under real world circumstances would be much harder to pull off. Not saying it isn't worth a try, but good luck pulling it off.

Like you, I hardly ever ride in those scenarios, but just today got caught in bumper to bumper, stop and go traffic in a construction zone in a small village on my way to the dentist. I left about a cars length in front of me at each stop (maybe fifty stops) so I could shoot straight ahead 20 feet if necessary, but there was no where to go on either side due to oncoming traffic on the left and road repair going on my the right. Luckily traffic was barely moving so if someone did hit me from behind it would have been a real slow hit, but honestly paying attention to the traffic in front of me was requiring all of my concentration. I just had to trust the person behind me was paying attention as well.

I know on my way home, when I got out of the town and onto the backroads where I normally ride, it was like being set free lol

BTW the town where I live has 3 lights, one at each end of town and one connecting to the state highway on a side street in the middle
 

670cc

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So, if stopped straight, you'd have to make a decision to go one direction or the other, which would take time to make that decision, then turning the bars in the direction of escape, and executing the escape without running into something yourself. I think talking about it is all well and good, but being able to actually do it under real world circumstances would be much harder to pull off. Not saying it isn't worth a try, but good luck pulling it off.
Yes, good luck pulling it off. As complicated as escaping a rear end attack might be, don’t forget that in regards to a main topic of this thread, if you keep your stopped bike in gear rather than neutral, that’s one less step that needs to happen to make the escape.
 

dduelin

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I stop behind the vehicle ahead positioned so I can see around it which places me at the lane edge and at the corner of the vehicle. Yes, I am committed to one escape route there but I don't have to stop at an angle or turn the bars to escape - I go pretty much straight ahead.
 

Oldbear

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I was always in gear, clutch in, right foot on brake. Do “NOT” rev the engine at a light. Many many moons ago I was sitting at a light on my 6 month old 67 Yamaha 305 Crosscountry. With both feet on the ground. A car full of girls pulled up next to me (gotta be cool for the chickies, right?). I tached up the Yamaha fairly high blipping the throttle. Just then the clutch cable broke() and I executed a beautiful wheelie through a red light across a four lane highway-clutch lever still against the bars while I hung on for dear life. Only by the grace of God did I not become a hood ornament for oncoming traffic. (I believe the Good Lord protects young men and fools and I was both at the time). Often wonder what the girls thought (“Look at that moron”; “ what an idiot”; etc.) watching my performance. After that I never, ever, revved an in gear motorcycle-lesson learned
 

Gixus

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Stopping at an angle would commit oneself to exiting in only one direction. Stopping straight but with sufficient maneuvering space between your bike and the vehicle ahead would perhaps allow two potential escape routes.

Honestly, I reduce the need to contemplate safety planning in these scenarios by not putting myself in these situations in the first place. As a general rule, I don’t ride in cities, nor in traffic. I live in the countryside, and typically ride in the countryside, on rural highways or in the forests. The county I live in has a total of two traffic lights. I do not commute, nor do I run errands on a bike, and have little need to be in a (dangerous) urban high traffic environment. The big city riding environment is too dangerous, in my opinion, and if I can avoid it, I do.
I agree that the big city riding environment is dangerous for motorcycle riders. I had occasion for a number of years to ride in the city on a daily basis as part of my employment. It was very rare that a day passed without me having to take evasive action to avoid ending up in hospital.
 

AVG1940

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Thanks…and I just realized I didn’t say might I said probably doing it wrong, a little more incendiary than I intended. Oh well, not the first time I stepped in it and surely not the last.
Good topic, good replies.
 

itsmenc700

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ddualin - HOW would a Harley know that his bike is still running if he didnt rev his bike every few seconds at a stop???
I mean he isnt doin it to get noticed or anything!

the Ferret - Good points.

 

MZ5

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HOW will the masses react to a motorcycle pulling past them up to the stop line and getting in front of them JUST because they are a bike??
People pull guns and hit the workers at fast food joints for not getting their order correct!!
I just dont see it working very well.

I understand your concern, but the states that have explicitly legalized it are seeing very good results. Lane filtering is legal, or at least not illegal, in:
AZ
CA
CO
FL
GA
HI
IL
LA
MD
NV
NH
NC
OK
OR
SC
TX

...according to this lawyer's website:
 
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