Where stands your "fear line"?

L.B.S.

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Pop the front wheel up on the curb. Let the rear wheel stay on the road. At an angle continue travelling down the road. "What chicken lines?" Takes some practice but it works. The only reason why i do it (with new tires) is because i don't like slippery surprises when cornering.
Every new motorcycle I've ever bought, or every set of new tires installed, I've either done that, or gone to similar lengths to scrub the tires. Except my NC700X with zero km's showing on the clock.

Guess which only bike in the history of my 44+ years riding, chucked me on my butt, 5 ft. out of the dealership driveway? lol :rolleyes:


But it was my imagination, of course. New tires aren't slippery anymore, and they don't have a mold release compound on them, according to everybody who "knows". :p
 

ronsaw

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Hi all,

this picture of my Bridgestone BT23R was taken after some turns on the racetrack in Padborg in South-Denmark. My SuperMoto was out of order so I had to use my daily NC700X. Inspite of the relatively low power I had a lot of fun but it was obvious that the NC isn't designed for the race-track. The maximum lean angle of about 40° is far away from that of other bikes. In right turns the limitation is given from the exhaust, in left turns the side stand throws out sparks.

However, the NC is save even at higher lean angles. Don't be shy - it works!

Knut
That's pretty darn impressive...bravo!
 

ronsaw

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I'm in the 5-8 mm range on my chicken strips. For me, the NC will do anything I ask it to. I had a fairly spirited ride this morning through the twisties. It does just fine, and is still fun to roll out of corners with - provided you are in the right gear to use engine torque to your advantage. Nothing like the old ZX-9, but I am happy with it. I tell you guys, a person hasn't lived unless they have been trying to canyon-carve on my first bike, a '93 Suzuki Intruder 1400. I had only ridden a Honda Trail 70 before this - bought it new and trailered it home until I had the nerve to throw a leg over it. Eventually, I was confident (and 22 years young and ignorant) enough to fall in with the sport bikes in our group. Sure, I was in the rear, but metal scraping and sparks be damned, I tried!

Here is a pic - it was identical to this one.

Intruder.jpg
 

the f

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I lean further and much more often on my newest Michelin PR4 tyres. They are in a completely different league to the original bridgestones. I had no confidence in those at all, especially in the rain. My tyres do wear more in the centre as most of my miles are motorway commuting, but they do get used right up to the edge.

Its always my toes that hit the ground first rather than the foot pegs, though I do have massive feet :eek: I wear a pair of sport / touring boots with toe sliders, and I'm onto my 3rd slider on the left foot. They haven't worn down, one was ripped off completely and the second sheared one of the fixing bolts. I remember the first time I made contact with the ground, I didn't feel like I was going quickly at all and it was totally unexpected. My butt changed the shape of the seat that day :D
 

Bullseye

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I run a TKC80 up front and a K60 rear....In the twists last week in BC ....had no "chicken strips" on them. That TKC80 worked better than I thought.....had wear right to the side 1/2 knobs !!!
 

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Pop the front wheel up on the curb. Let the rear wheel stay on the road. At an angle continue travelling down the road. "What chicken lines?" Takes some practice but it works. The only reason why i do it (with new tires) is because i don't like slippery surprises when cornering.
Hmm. How to keep it from riding up? Pics/vid would help a lot.

Its always my toes that hit the ground first rather than the foot pegs
My butt changed the shape of the seat that day :D
Me too.
 

londonrider

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Old topic but thought I'd share. I'm a fairly new rider (have been riding only for 6 months and done more than 5000mi) and bought my NC700S '12 first photo is only a few days after I bought it. After I gained a bit more confidence I started leaning more. I once even scraped the right foot peg and that gave me a massive buzz. Second photo is how my rear try looks like right now. I've not done any track days on it and it's only in town commuting. Weather hasn't been the warmest (averaging about 8 degrees C in Feb) but the tyres seem to have held up well. I did have a couple of sketchy moments when going over white lines even on dry roads but I'm not riding it aggressively at all, just trying to to gradually build up. IMG_0303.jpgIMG_0341.jpg
 

Therapy

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You don't get that kind of wear being a "new rider".
Maybe new to the NC but miles on the CBR600RR?

Like..........wow man!!
 

TN Thunder

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I do the majority of my riding in the mountains of East TN and W. N. Carolina. Leaning is the hardest part of riding the NC to me other than the seat. I'm use to riding cruisers where you are seated considerably lower than the NC and I have dragged the pegs on my Valkyrie numerous times and she's a big girl. However, the NC sits higher and I feel like I'm sitting right over the front tire. I am getting more use to it in leaning and this morning I forgot for a minute about that new tire and went into a tight flat curve and found myself at about a 45 degree angle. I have found that you can lean farther than you think and on sweepers I just slide my rear over a little to shift some body weight. I had the rear wheel skip once doing this but I believe it was due to dust on the road, not the leaning position. But it did grab my attention. One problem here in E. TN is that a lot of the back road curves aren't continuous. They may tighten up or straighten out which will throw your lean set-up off quickly.
 

bamamate

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I do the majority of my riding in the mountains of East TN and W. N. Carolina. Leaning is the hardest part of riding the NC to me other than the seat. I'm use to riding cruisers where you are seated considerably lower than the NC and I have dragged the pegs on my Valkyrie numerous times and she's a big girl. However, the NC sits higher and I feel like I'm sitting right over the front tire. I am getting more use to it in leaning and this morning I forgot for a minute about that new tire and went into a tight flat curve and found myself at about a 45 degree angle. I have found that you can lean farther than you think and on sweepers I just slide my rear over a little to shift some body weight. I had the rear wheel skip once doing this but I believe it was due to dust on the road, not the leaning position. But it did grab my attention. One problem here in E. TN is that a lot of the back road curves aren't continuous. They may tighten up or straighten out which will throw your lean set-up off quickly.
Something that might help you with body position is to drop the inside elbow so that you are basically looking between the windscreen and the mirror. That will help shift your upper body into the lean. You don't have to hang way over like a sport bike rider. Just that little shift of the upper body will help the feel of the bike in a turn.
 

670cc

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Something that might help you with body position is to drop the inside elbow so that you are basically looking between the windscreen and the mirror. That will help shift your upper body into the lean. You don't have to hang way over like a sport bike rider. Just that little shift of the upper body will help the feel of the bike in a turn.
Ditto that. The experienced rider course I took a year ago taught that technique. I admit I don't practice it regularly but I could see how it would encourage proper body position.
 

dduelin

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Something that might help you with body position is to drop the inside elbow so that you are basically looking between the windscreen and the mirror. That will help shift your upper body into the lean. You don't have to hang way over like a sport bike rider. Just that little shift of the upper body will help the feel of the bike in a turn.
+1. Dropping the inside shoulder gets our torso inside of a vertical line drawn down thru the centerline of the bike and saves a few degrees of lean angle for the same radius of turn. In a decreasing radius turn, one that "tightens up" as you get further into the turn, getting the upper body into the turn gives an additional margin of safety to lean over more to make the turn without dragging hard parts or running wide and off pavement.

 

DCTFAN

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So, how do you measure the lean angle (max. lean)
someone mentioned 40 deg.? Is that accurate?
 

Cigar Mike

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+1. Dropping the inside shoulder gets our torso inside of a vertical line drawn down thru the centerline of the bike and saves a few degrees of lean angle for the same radius of turn. In a decreasing radius turn, one that "tightens up" as you get further into the turn, getting the upper body into the turn gives an additional margin of safety to lean over more to make the turn without dragging hard parts or running wide and off pavement.

That has been the biggest thing for me to learn. It is just the opposite riding in the dirt. You push the handle bar down and weight the outside peg and remain vertical.
 

TN Thunder

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I'm use to riding a cruiser and use to dragging foot pegs but the NC is much higher so if I'm dragging pegs I have done a High Side and sliding down the road. I have gotten way over, say nearly 45 degree in curves and it held okay. However, once you get past that momentum range it is going to slide out from under you. There's about an inch or so from the edge of the rim to the edge of the tread. I just went out and checked my tires and you can see where it has been down to that edge point. That's as far as I want to go and maybe even not that far on some road surfaces. The NC sits a lot higher so that has been one of the hardest things I have found to get use to is the lean angle and where I live if you can't lean you probably need to use the car.
 

DCTFAN

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.... The maximum lean angle of about 40° is far away from that of other bikes. In right turns the limitation is given from the exhaust, in left turns the side stand throws out sparks.

However, the NC is save even at higher lean angles. Don't be shy - it works!

Knut
Does it mean the muffler(RHS) and sidestand (LHS) will scrape before the pegs?
I know the CTX700 muffler will scrape but the NC too?
 

dduelin

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I'm use to riding a cruiser and use to dragging foot pegs but the NC is much higher so if I'm dragging pegs I have done a High Side and sliding down the road. I have gotten way over, say nearly 45 degree in curves and it held okay. However, once you get past that momentum range it is going to slide out from under you. There's about an inch or so from the edge of the rim to the edge of the tread. I just went out and checked my tires and you can see where it has been down to that edge point. That's as far as I want to go and maybe even not that far on some road surfaces. The NC sits a lot higher so that has been one of the hardest things I have found to get use to is the lean angle and where I live if you can't lean you probably need to use the car.
The first thing that touches or drags on the NC700X is the replaceable "hero nut" on the underside of the tip of the footpegs. The peg feeler clearly visible in the picture - the long thing about to touch is the rubber hose for the fuel tank overflow. The hero nut is to the right of the hose. If we continue to lean further then the sidestand or muffler can touch and possibly lever the rear wheel off the pavement. I dragged the peg feelers a few times with the 2012 X but not yet the 2015. I raised the suspension about 1/2" on the 2015 and that gives additional clearance over my first NC.

While it is possible to drag stuff on the NC700X there is actually a lot of clearance for normal sporty riding. I felt like I was on my ear in this photo but the peg feeler has a long way to go to touch down. My limits are well above the NCs - leaving a large margin for additional lean. I've done a couple of track days and among other things it taught me that today's motorcycle tire limits on good pavement are way above my fear line.

 

londonrider

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You don't get that kind of wear being a "new rider".
Maybe new to the NC but miles on the CBR600RR?

Like..........wow man!!
Ha thanks but trust me I get to ride the CBR very rarely thanks to the amazing weather here in the UK! I gained most of my experience with body positioning and leaning on the NC. And it gave me a lot of confidence on the CBR.
 
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