High tech riding aids

DCTFAN

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I've been riding the new AT DCT with traction control adjustable in three levels.
I know the technology and how it works, but don't find it very useful so far.
I've cut my teeth using DCT and learning throttle control to take riding to my limits
and achieved a good sense of control in various riding types.

Can some of you comment on how TC improves your riding?
Is there a specific way to take advantage?
 

bamamate

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No matter what surface type you are on, always pin the throttle. Then it will be useful.
 

potter0o

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I have not had traction control on a motorcycle but I did have it on my Mustang. For me it tried to stop the wheel from spinning out. For example if your in snow it will prevent one wheel from spinning quicker and digging a deeper hole. In some situations it was helpful and others not. Driving in the winter it help control the wheels from excessively spinning out..controlled acceleration in slippery conditions. When the vehicle go stuck it was annoying as you could not rock it out of a rut so would turn it off.

Interesting puzzle to have on a bike. Can you take it to some loose gravel, apply some front brakes and throttle to see what happens?
 

DCTFAN

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No matter what surface type you are on, always pin the throttle. Then it will be useful.
Never fails. but on gravel, always got me in trouble on the NC.
The AT is more forgiving, if I leave TC on the lowest level; rear ABS off and 'G' mode ON.
 

DCTFAN

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I have not had traction control on a motorcycle but I did have it on my Mustang. For me it tried to stop the wheel from spinning out. For example if your in snow it will prevent one wheel from spinning quicker and digging a deeper hole. In some situations it was helpful and others not. Driving in the winter it help control the wheels from excessively spinning out..controlled acceleration in slippery conditions. When the vehicle go stuck it was annoying as you could not rock it out of a rut so would turn it off.

Interesting puzzle to have on a bike. Can you take it to some loose gravel, apply some front brakes and throttle to see what happens?
First thing I tried. What happens is that even on the lowest setting, TC will kick in and modify the fuel injection to keep the rear from spinning
out of control, but pinning the throttle and not getting the same response; I feel a bit dejected. TC is definitely not useful for off road riding.
I haven't rode in the rain yet, but I guess just like in a car, the TC will shine in corners and take offs.
 

bamamate

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I could see times where it would be useful. On-road in the rain and pesky paint stripes in a turn that catch many a rider. Off-road on the lowest setting would help keep the tail in control when using the throttle to steer in corners. Steep up hill with loose rock when you would normally be feathering the clutch a lot to keep from spinning out. Water crossings in loose rock, seen several people wind up digging a hole from spinning. Muddy road where just a tad too much throttle causes you to spin. Not so much on the NC but on my 250 I feather the clutch a lot to help control wheel spin.
 

mike5100

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I understand it can prevent a highside. But unless the NC is on really poor road surface its low power is probably not going to cause a problem. I have seen a Rocket accelerate out of a roundabout on wet tarmac and the back wheel starts spinning and moves sideways. The rider kills the throttle but this lets the tyre now bite the road and the bike tumbles through the air. It started happening to me once (on my Rocket) in exactly the same conditions but I don't know what I did as it came back into line fortunately. Triumph were obviously worried about this but instead of putting traction control on the bike they limited the amount of torque available in the first 3 gears. They later removed this restriction on 2013 models onwards
Mike
 

dduelin

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First thing I tried. What happens is that even on the lowest setting, TC will kick in and modify the fuel injection to keep the rear from spinning
out of control, but pinning the throttle and not getting the same response; I feel a bit dejected. TC is definitely not useful for off road riding.
I haven't rode in the rain yet, but I guess just like in a car, the TC will shine in corners and take offs.
The 48 rwhp NC has "analog" TC ....... there isn't enough power to the rear wheel to get into too much trouble when doing something dumb. A rank novice or ham fisted rider whacking the throttle open when leaned over or on a slippery surface has to work at losing control. The AT with 94 rwhp could bite hard when treated the same way. When it cuts power to the rear wheel the TC is doing just what it is supposed to do. I have read that Honda's TC in the AT is very protective however and the least intrusive level of TC might be the one you would want to use off road and trust your built-in TC on pavement and switch off TC altogether. When TC started showing up on 90-100 hp bikes many people said "why?" but now new bikes will all have it because it is conspicuous in its absence. It's required tech to compete in the market.
 

DCTFAN

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Done some more riding with different TC settings.
On pavement, I decided to leave it ON, default setting, which is the highest level of intervention.
Found out quickly, this was best for now, because I found myself twisting the throttle in twisties as if I was still on the NC.
I'll take it off or set it lower as I become more accustomed to her "wild side".

Off the tarmac, it really does not help much unless you put in lowest mode. There are many instances, when it kicks in,
it comes as a surprise because you don't expect it. I guess that's exactly how it's supposed to work: instead of an unexpected
slide, a surprise TC intervention. I'll take the latter.
But, I'm keeping it in low for now. My off road ventures are mostly mild gravel mixed with few creek crossings and patches of dirt.

I don't want to become too dependent on this feature, because
I don't want my riding style to become so erratic, with no fine sense of
control over what the engine and tires are doing as I manipulate my throttle.

Or, do any of you think it's better to ride without it, carefully, and then put it on
as insurance?

canada-creek_2016JUL.jpg
 

Old Can Ride

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I know that I would not want to find out what the AT TC did when riding across Atlanta at night in a hard rain storm in the middle of the winter. Just reading your AT DCT comments, makes me see I have a new learning curve if I ever get my AT DCT. It will be interesting in all the sand and clay gumbo around my local area.
 
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dduelin

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Done some more riding with different TC settings.
On pavement, I decided to leave it ON, default setting, which is the highest level of intervention.
Found out quickly, this was best for now, because I found myself twisting the throttle in twisties as if I was still on the NC.
I'll take it off or set it lower as I become more accustomed to her "wild side".

Off the tarmac, it really does not help much unless you put in lowest mode. There are many instances, when it kicks in,
it comes as a surprise because you don't expect it. I guess that's exactly how it's supposed to work: instead of an unexpected
slide, a surprise TC intervention. I'll take the latter.
But, I'm keeping it in low for now. My off road ventures are mostly mild gravel mixed with few creek crossings and patches of dirt.

I don't want to become too dependent on this feature, because
I don't want my riding style to become so erratic, with no fine sense of
control over what the engine and tires are doing as I manipulate my throttle.

Or, do any of you think it's better to ride without it, carefully, and then put it on
as insurance?
Perhaps when riding off-road with it on try and develop the skill level to not have it intervene? I mean have it on but minimize it's interventions. I don't mean to be flippant but the best TC is the brain to right wrist connection. If you can feel what's going on at the contact patches you are doing just what the computer will do for you. EDIT... but the computer is there for you if you misjudge traction or roll across a small something that breaks the wheel loose. A safety net if you will. Otherwise depend on your skill not to trip the TC.
 
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DCTFAN

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Perhaps when riding off-road with it on try and develop the skill level to not have it intervene? I mean have it on but minimize it's interventions. I don't mean to be flippant but the best TC is the brain to right wrist connection. If you can feel what's going on at the contact patches you are doing just what the computer will do for you. EDIT... but the computer is there for you if you misjudge traction or roll across a small something that breaks the wheel loose. A safety net if you will. Otherwise depend on your skill not to trip the TC.
Sound advice. But already realized your point, on the day of the pic.
I was riding with Alfred_Bham on the Silver DCT. He has dirt exp coming out the whazoo!
He told me he rides in manual mode with TC off. Learned my limits that day.
So every time on the route where the trail becomes harder, with tighter turns and incline/decline
he disappears, all of a sudden. I can't even see his dust trail; he is so far gone.
When I asked him what happens at twisties, he grins and says he can't help it. :p
Enduro racing, in his blood and the AT just suits him fine.
We were both on stock Dunlops.

Thanks for all the input thus far.
 

DCTFAN

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I know that I would not want to find out what the AT TC did when riding across Atlanta at night in a hard rain storm in the middle of the winter. Just reading your AT DCT comments, makes me see I have a new learning curve if I ever get my AT DCT. It will be interesting in all the sand and clay gumbo around my local area.
I doubt that "curve" will be very steep. Your will just be a rider 'reborn'.
You better get yourself ready for her. Less than a month away?
Did you get your low seat on order? I am still waiting (ordered a month ago) for a $9 piece to complete
my top case lock. Right now, instead of a key hole there is a nice hole for all sorts of critters to go in.:D
.
 

DCTFAN

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I have not had traction control on a motorcycle but I did have it on my Mustang. For me it tried to stop the wheel from spinning out. For example if your in snow it will prevent one wheel from spinning quicker and digging a deeper hole. In some situations it was helpful and others not. Driving in the winter it help control the wheels from excessively spinning out..controlled acceleration in slippery conditions. When the vehicle go stuck it was annoying as you could not rock it out of a rut so would turn it off.

Interesting puzzle to have on a bike. Can you take it to some loose gravel, apply some front brakes and throttle to see what happens?
I did not deliberately test TC this way, but the first intervention was very intrusive.
The way I understand Honda implemented their TC is by controlling the fuel injection,
which makes the intervention somewhat abrupt and noticeable ( a good thing I guess)

..
 
W

wideguy

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please see this system from bosch

traction control, abs and stability control


these are now all standard system on cars.... motorcycle are far behind because we the consumer has not really ask for it.
All the hot modern top line sportbikes have sophisticated traction control, as good as in high dollar modern sports cars. (Stability on your motorcycle will depend solely on you... If you screw it up bad enough, it will spit you off, then sometimes straighten up and continue on without you.)

Traction control will potentially save your *** if you weren't being too stupid to begin with...
 
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