[Review] Invoxia Cellular GPS Tracker

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Dude, Where’s My Bike?​

Putting the tracker in the tail storage area of Ducati/ stock photo
Photo Credit: Invoxia

As the 2021 riding season started, I planned a solo two-week-long road trip to Yellowstone National Park. One of the major concerns I had for the trip was safety. Specifically, I was worried about my bike getting stolen while I stopped overnight.

The solution was twofold; prevention of theft by a bike lock or an alarm and retrieval of the motorcycle with a tracking device in case it is stolen. I already have a heavy-duty bike lock, but I needed a GPS tracker that works even in remote areas.

Invoxia is a French company that offers GPS tracking devices for vehicles and pets and currently operates in Europe and the United States. Their Cellular GPS Tracker, which uses 4G LTE-M and works anywhere in the US, seemed to be a good choice for the task.

Out of the Box​

GPS tracker front view with a leather strap / stock photo
Photo Credit: Invoxia

The GPS tracker came in a neat little box. The device weighs only 1.05 oz and measures 4 inches X 1inch X .4 inch with a sturdy leather strap. A slight indentation on the backside is actually a reboot button. Its overall simple and sleek design is aesthetically pleasing.

Invoxia GPS tracker came with a simple instruction sheet, and a micro USB charging cable.

It came with a short instruction to download the companion app to start the device. My first impression was, “That’s it?” There were no other documents that explain functions or a user manual as par for the course with newer tech devices. (The online user manual is under construction at the time of writing.)

Instead, most of the information is available through the FAQ page of their website. I am not that tech-savvy, so I always feel apprehensive about not having manuals in print or online. That being said, the initial setup was straightforward.

It took about an hour and a half to charge the battery first. After that, I just downloaded the app and followed the simple prompts. This process took about 10 minutes, and the tracker was good to go.

Where Should I Put It Though?​


An important feature (or lack of) regarding this specific tracker is that it is not waterproof.

While it has an IP33 rating, this poses a significant issue because no area on the motorcycle remains completely dry when it rains. Invoxia offers GPS trackers that are waterproof, and I do not understand why they didn’t make this one waterproof also.


My first ride with a GPS tracker was on a sunny day, so I simply placed it in the storage area under the tail cowl. It fitted nicely, but during the ride, the vibration moved the device a lot. I found the tracker’s leather strap hanging out from the small gap between the cowl and the tail body when I stopped.


On the second ride, the local weather forecast was showing a slight chance of rain. So I put the tracker in the vinyl bag in which the bike’s owner’s manual is kept. My Honda VFR has a slot for the manual in the tail storage area, and the device didn’t move much during the ride this time.

However, I am not sure if the bag is waterproof and also seriously doubt that the tail storage remains sufficiently dry for the tracker on a rainy day. It is not water-tight, and it accumulates a lot of condensation.

I expect to encounter some rain on my road trip, so I purchased a small waterproof vinyl bag used outdoors to store the tracker. Hopefully, this is enough to keep the device dry enough to function properly.


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GPS Tracking and Location Updates​


Low (left) and Standard (right) location update frequencies

There are three settings for location update frequency; High (every 5 to 7mins), Standard (every 10 to 12mins), and Low (every 30 to 32 mins). If the bike is stationary, it only updates the position every 24 hours to save the battery.

On my first test ride, I set the frequency to Low and headed out to the desert, where I usually lose cellular signal. The screenshot on the left is the locations reported; it was too infrequent, but my bike’s locations were tracked.

The screenshot on the right shows practically the same route in Standard setting, which becomes more detailed. The screenshot below is on the High setting on a different ride.

Because I live in an area with freeways and fast roads with almost no traffic lights, my preferred setting is High report frequency. In case my bike is stolen, it will be more precise in locating the last reported position.

However, if you live or ride mainly in the city with more stop-and-go traffic, the Standard setting may suffice. It depends on personal preference and how often you would like to charge the device, which I will talk about next.

Screenshot of tracking at HIGH frequency location update
High frequency location updates

Battery Life​


Invoxia GPS tracker getting charged with a micro USB charging cable.

Invoxia Cellular GPS tracker has a long battery life compared to other GPS trackers. According to Invoxia’s website, depending on the location report frequency setting, it lasts 15 days to 7 weeks with a single charge. So far, I only had to charge it twice after the initial charge, and it charged within two hours.

This is great because I don’t have to wait too long to charge the tracker fully, and I can keep the device on the bike almost all the time. What’s the point if the anti-theft device needs to be charged overnight, right?

Battery life
Photo Credit: Invoxia

Proximity Radar​


I admit that I often forget where I parked my car in a mall or concert venue. But I can attest that it has never happened with my motorcycle. Nonetheless, I tested this proximity radar feature in a large parking lot. Proximity radar uses Bluetooth.

You start by going to the place you think your bike is, and as soon as the phone detects the tracker’s Bluetooth, it gives you the prompt to stop. This distance varied from 45 feet to 20 feet. Then the screen gives you the graphic which indicates you are moving closer or further from the device.

Turning on the ringer on the tracker was helpful, but the sound was not loud enough to detect if the environment was somewhat noisy, especially since the tracker was in a plastic bag and stored under the cowl.

Having said that, I expect to use this radar more often than not. I’ll definitely bring the tracker the next time I need to park my car in a huge parking lot.

Notification​


Photo Credit: Invoxia

There are three notifications: Zone alert, Movement/Tilt alert, and Significant Journey alert.

The Zone alert is a geofencing alert that your device is leaving or arriving at the predefined area you set on the companion app. The zone radius can be as small as 328.1ft to as large as 0.6 miles.

When the device detects movement after it remains stationary for more than 5 mins, it sends a Movement or Tilt alert. It works for suspicious movement/ tilt and also when someone hits your parked bike.

The Significant journey alert is triggered when the new location of the bike is detected after it remains stationary for 5 mins.

In addition to the tracker’s push notification, you can also sign up for a free IFTTT service to receive a text message or email. I set up the applet to send me an email when the motion is detected. This setting has been working well to give me peace of mind when I’m away from my phone but on my laptop.

I like that both push notifications and IFTTT notifications seem to arrive quickly within a minute of the device detecting movements or crossing the predefined zone. The only time I hated these notifications was when I rode out without setting the device to stand by on the app. I received all kinds of alerts and location updates during my ride, and it drove me crazy. If you would like to enjoy your ride, do not forget this process.

Value​


Invoxia Cellular GPS Tracker is $129 with a one-year subscription (after one year, $39.90 per year), and there are no other fees. This is an exceptional value compared to other GPS trackers.

Comparable Devices​


There are many options for GPS tracking devices. One popular choice is the Tracki Mini Real Time 4G GPS tracker. It offers unlimited tracking worldwide. Battery life can be short as few days if you use real-time tracking updates. The device is relatively inexpensive at $26.12. However, it requires a subscription that is $19.95 / month.

Another popular tracker is Spytec GPS GL300. Battery life is relatively short, up to 2.5 weeks. It also requires a subscription that costs a minimum of $19.95 / month.

From what I could find, other comparable trackers can be as low as $26, but all of them require a tracking service subscription, which adds up to more than $200 yearly.

Updates and Customer Service​


Even while I was testing the device for about a month, they had few updates to address the minor bug issues and improving the compatibility on android. Their customer service team seems to be very responsive to users’ opinions which is a good sign.

The tracker comes with a one-year warranty. I appreciate a company that listens to customers to improve their products and provides a good warranty. Kudos to Invoxia.

Invoxia GPS Tracker Specifications​


Per Invoxia’s website, here are some of the key product specifications.

Key Features​

  • Outdoor positioning via low power GPS
  • Indoor and outdoor positioning via WPS
  • Proximity positioning via the application (Bluetooth)
  • User-adjustable point generation frequency
  • Possibility to create safe areas with line-crossing alerts
  • Search for the nearby Tracker using the radar function and the Tracker’s buzzer function
  • Service life of the rechargeable battery: 2 weeks to 4 months according to modes
  • Specific algorithms to save battery according to location changes.

It is compatible with iOS 12.0 or higher, compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch Android 5.0 (Lollipop) or higher. As previously mentioned, it is also IP33 rated.

For a full list of features and other information such as compatibility, check out Invoxia’s product page, which contains their technical datasheet.

Final Verdict​


The Invoxia GPS Tracker is on my bike all the time now.

I was slightly apprehensive about not having a user manual at first, but I realized that it is user-friendly and doesn’t need a manual as I tested the tracker.

I like the fast-charging battery that lasts a long time which is a necessary characteristic for anti-theft tracking devices.

The tracker works anywhere in the US, and you receive notification within a minute of movement or crossing the line of the predetermined area. It works with the IFTTT service, which adds more to my peace of mind with different notifications like texts and emails.

My complaint about the tracker is that it is not waterproof. For now, I will keep the tracker in the waterproof bag, but I hope Invoxia releases the waterproof version of this cellular tracker.


Pros​

  • Notifications come to the phone quickly
  • Fast Charging / Long Battery life
  • $129 with a one-year subscription is an excellent value
  • Works anywhere in the US
  • Works with IFTTT service

Cons​

  • Not waterproof
  • Ringer is not loud enough


Specs​

  • Manufacturer: Invoxia
  • Price: $129 includes a one-year subscription
  • Made in: China
  • Sizes: 4 inches X 1 inch X .4inches (105 x 27 x 9.5 mm)
  • Colors: Black
  • Safety Designations: N/A
  • Review Date: June 2021

Important Links / Where to Buy​



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Invoxia Cellular GPS Tracker Photo Gallery​

Battery life
Photo Credit: Invoxia
Screenshot of a notification on Iphone/ stock photo
GPS tracker front view with a leather strap / stock photo
Photo Credit: Invoxia
Putting the tracker in the tail storage area of Ducati/ stock photo
Screenshot of proximity radar prompt notifying that you are in the Bluetooth range of tracker
Screenshot of proximity radar prompt to start moving.
Screenshot of tracking at Low location frequency update
Screenshot of proximity radar displaying my location in relation to the bike
Screenshot of tracking at HIGH frequency location update
High frequency location updates
Screenshot of a notification on my Android
Screenshot of proximity radar displaying I am getting close to the bike
Screenshot of prompt when you turn on proximity radar.
Screenshot of tracking at Standard frequency location update
Invoxia GPS tracker getting charged with a micro USB charging cable.
Invoxia GPS tracker came with a simple instruction sheet, and a micro USB charging cable.
GPS tracker in the vinyl bag of owners manual stored in the slot of tail storage
GPS tracker in the vinyl bag of owners manual
The leather strap of the GPS tracker coming out from the gap of the cawl.
GPS tracker in the tail storage of VFR800
Up close view of Invoxia cellular GPS tracker

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Griff

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I got my Invoxia in the post yesterday. My primary use for this item is on my CRF300L. Initially all appeared good and although spaces on this bike are scarce, I had found one and proceeded to try it. However the tracker didn't work in that position and my initial anti theft test failed. Invoxia however specify that the unit should not be surrounded by metal. Again not easy on the CRF but I eventually found a spot that I can use while the bike is parked, but I could not leave it in that position permanently. I tested again and almost immediately I got a report on my phone that the bike was being interfered with. No doubt there would be plenty of space on a larger bike to mount this tracker.
Today I will test the unit on a ride, and it will be mounted in the tank bag for that purpose. I will report back again later.
 

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I have lots of old phones lying around. Instead of buying this device, could this same function be provided by putting an app on an old cell phone and subscribing to a basic cellular service for roughly $20/month? While the service cost is higher, you also get a secondary phone service preferably on a different carrier than your main phone, therefore acting as a possible backup for outgoing emergency calls should you be in an area where your main phone lacks coverage. Leave the old phone in the motorcycle or vehicle that you want to track. Provide backup power if needed.
 
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problem here is use of cellular (if there's no cellular there's no tracking), and remembering to charge the device. Using an old phone could work, but battery life on gps on most phones is poor, so there's that.

Devices like the Spot Trace may be the better option -- $50 for the device and $10/mth for service. Runs on lithium AAA batteries or can be powered by usb.
 

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problem here is use of cellular (if there's no cellular there's no tracking), and remembering to charge the device. Using an old phone could work, but battery life on gps on most phones is poor, so there's that.

Devices like the Spot Trace may be the better option -- $50 for the device and $10/mth for service. Runs on lithium AAA batteries or can be powered by usb.
Problem with Spot may be satellite access or view of the sky if the device is inside a building or blocked by forest trees, etc. If you hide the Spot deep inside the motorcycle, does it still communicate well?
 

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Back from a 170k spin. Nothing much to report other than it appears to function as per the review above. I have a query on how to download the tracker log and I will take that up with the help desk. My main purpose for this tracker is to alert me to any suspicious activity while the bike is parked overnight or when left unattended for any length of time. So far it seems to work satisfactorily in that regard. I will however have a better idea of how well it is working when I get a handle on the tracker log.
 
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Problem with Spot may be satellite access or view of the sky if the device is inside a building or blocked by forest trees, etc. If you hide the Spot deep inside the motorcycle, does it still communicate well?
the only time I've had trouble with the Spot Gen3 seeing a satellite was under a bridge or in a tunnel ... trees never mattered. I assume that if it's surrounded by metal on the bike reception will suffer. It seems the gps trackers LEO's and PI's put on cars would be a solution also.
 

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Further update on my Invoxia. It has been on the CRF for the past two weeks at my home. I haven't been using the bike. This thing is certainly sensitive. Because the bike is perched almost vertically on its sidestand, it doesn't take much to disturb it. It is at the side of my house close to a wall with a cover on. However a gust of wind could rock it gently. Accordingly this has highlighted the sensitivity of the unit which has sent me several messages on my phone over the past two weeks to advise that the tilt aspect has been activated. I was able to see from the app that the bike was not being moved illegally though so I was not unduly alarmed. In the end I had to take measures to totally stabilise the bike and then the messages stopped.
 

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Hmmm. The messages have recommenced as of yesterday afternoon. So there is a problem with false alarms and I am beginning to think they may be temperature related, because they do not happen overnight or early in the day as it now appears to be the case. I have dropped Invoxia a line to report the issue and await their response. In fairness their support folks are quick to respond as I had some early questions that were quickly dealt with. They also sent out a survey which I have completed.
This issue is more of a nuisance than a problem at the moment. There is also a safe zone aspect to the tracker which will still report to me if the bike is moved outside of it. I will report back again when I hear from Invoxia.
 

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Update on response from Invoxia. They advise no adverse affects of temperature for a start. They go on to advise that the "accelerometer" is quite sensitive and therefore "strong vibrations of the road" or even strong wind can trigger the alert.

In the interim for the past few days there have been no alerts other than acceptable ones where I clearly moved the bike while forgetting to disable the alarm. So I am left wondering what the trigger was. Perhaps a cat landing on the seat or some such.

Separately the battery on the unit is still showing 70% after my initial charging of it over three weeks ago. Nothing wrong with that.
 

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Further update on my Invoxia. To date I have used it as an anti theft device for when my CRF is parked up at home or when I am away. This weekend I was away trail riding. On my way home yesterday I put it on standby because I don't need it tracking my journey unnecessarily. During the journey home some moisture got past the seal on the small plastic bag that I was using to keep it dry. When I got home I then found that my phone would no longer connect with the unit to take it off standby. I contacted Invoxia via email to see if this can be rectified and await further contact from them. The tester above highlighted this vulnerability to moisture as a weakness of the system and unfortunately it is coming to pass for me. Tbh for motorcycle use which is advocated (and pet tracking) this is a weakness that is hard to understand.
In the interim I put the unit in the airing cupboard for the night where it would also get some heat. I tried it again this morning but no go, not even after a reset. I left it for a couple of hours and tried a reset again. Hey Presto it is up and running again. I will need to review my moisture prevention........
 

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Regrettably the performance of the Unit is random and it is still not 100%. I am now engaging with Invoxia in this regard.
 

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I am glad to report that my Invoxia is fully functioning again. As reported above it got wet during a journey home on the CRF. After that I put it in the airing cupboard for a couple of nights and I got partial functionality back again. The unit was struggling to connect with my phone to alter settings. I then engaged with Invoxia and went thru various processes. Things were still random.

At some point the Invoxia person reported to me that three separate phones were connected to the Unit. She pointed out that it was beyond the capability of the Unit to connect with all of them. Aha ! I told Her that I had put the Ap on my Wife's phone as an additional (to find my Iphone) means of tracking me in the more remote places that I visited on the bike. However the Wife had gone a step further and put it on her Ipad also, hence the three detected at Invoxia.

Given that the Unit is now mostly used as an anti theft device when the bike is parked up at home or away, there is no longer the need for the Wife to track me because She can do so on the phone anyway. She removed the Ap from her devices and presto ! the Invoxia is fully functional again and all issues sorted.

So in summary, despite the Invoxia warning against allowing the Unit to get wet, it has survived a dousing and is back in action. Furthermore I am told it is giving a strong signal to base :)
 
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