Best rainsuit?

Speedfilm

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Two days in a row now, I hit rain, one a really bad storm that actually blew a tree down in front of me. Normally don't ride when rain is forcast, but 20% chance is good enough for me to leave the cage at home. Wondering what rain suits would be the best choice so figured I'd ask here rather than depend on a paid endorsement on u Tube
 

670cc

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It doesn’t exactly answer your question, but if it’s August in Georgia, my choice for rain gear would be a mesh jacket and pants. Let it rain and drench me, so I can finally get some relief from the heat! Seriously, in the summer I just wear clothes that dry quickly (no cotton), and I just get all wet. Less than an hour or so of riding after the rain, I’m dry.

Nothing is worse than putting on a rain suit in summer, then sweating inside that hot rain suit. Putting on a rain suit in summer is a last resort, and only if you anticipate much more rain than a brief shower.

Winter riding would be a different story.
 
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melensdad

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I don't have a "suit" but I have a pair of waterproof Rev'it riding pants and a 2 jackets that are waterproof.

In an absolute downpour the pants would likely end up leaking a bit, especially at the waist, simply because they are not teamed up with a riding coat. The pants are a multi-layer deal, I typically wear them without the rain layer even if it is raining, unless it is supposed to be fairly heavy rain.

Jacket 1 is a FirstGear Kilimanjaro armored riding jacket, it is supposed to be waterproof but honestly in an intense and prolonged rain I would say it would be insufficient because the jacket if fairly short and it is likely that rain would enter along the waist. FirstGear makes a matching pant, which is overall style, paired together it would work as a system. Not saying it is "the best" rain system.

Jacket 2 is a Klim Gore-Tex rain jacket that is sized to wear OVER an armored riding jacket. It breathes reasonably well, it is my choice to wear over a Klim Apex Air armored riding jacket. In addition to being Gore-Tex (making it somewhat breathable) it has pit zips that help with breathability. If I ever decide to turn this jacket into a rain system I'd buy a pair of Gore-tex over-pants that zip together with this jacket. To me, a true Gore-Tex over system would be the "best" rain gear you could get.
 

greenboy

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Yeah, Greg,

Same with mesh and quick dry underlayers. Here, sometimes up high even when it's been hot the temperature drops rapidly and that's when I hit the raingear. And of course in the other seasons, when it's not only serves as raingear but as another thermal layer as well. I snagged killer deals on a Dainese Storm stretch jacket that doesn't flap in the wind even at NC high speeds, very visible in poor visibility and looks good and un-baggy, and a Gore-tex Paclite pant from Cabelas. Never been in the slightest bit wet even in torrential downpours. I might have gotten the Dainese Storm pant had Cabelas not had such a good offer on the pants I got. I've seen a lot of other good products though.
 

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I think it depends on your intended use. If it is just going to be used occasionally you may not want to invest in something expensive. This would be light duty and compact with a shorter life span. If you are a commuter or a distance rider you will probably want something better. I like to touch the gear and try it on. As a commuter that rides as much as possible I wanted real water proofing and durability. When I went to the stores they didn't have much in stock for rain gear as not many ride in the rain. I ended up going to an industrial clothing store and finding gear that would fit over my riding gear. I bought a bib style pant that I can put on while wearing boots. The jacket I wanted to be able to put on over my mesh coat. It is hi vis yellow with some reflective strips. I think the total cost for the set was $130. Breath ability is low but waterproof is 100%

My riding gear is a Joe Rocket layered system. The over jacket waterproofing is really good and I still use it. The pants had an inner liner that was not very good and now I only use the bib pants for rain.
 

Griff

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I use this with the corresponding trousers.


It is extremely light, easy to get on and folds up neatly in its own bag.
 

greenboy

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Hate inner liners. Too slow/hard to put them in when a sudden storm hits, and most of the rest of the time they are sweatboxes. A lot easier to whip raingear over what I already have on (zip calves on the pants). Since the basis of my riding gear is mesh until it consistently gets below 50F, I find that REALLY waterproof stuff works, no advantage to Gore-tex which I have as well, and zip vents have as often as not let in water. But then here when the rain actually needs to be avoided is also when the temperature is not so high that I need relief anyway.
 
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greenboy

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I use this with the corresponding trousers.


It is extremely light, easy to get on and folds up neatly in its own bag.
That must be the same fabric my Dainese Storm jacket has. Really great stuff, packs almost as small as coated ripstop, has a great streamlined fit without being constricting, seems to be very durable and does not flap in the wind/gusting.
 

Speedfilm

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Thanks all. Just looking for something I can keep stashed in the frunk for occasional use but don't want to buy crap. I have one of those fifty cent ponchos Disneyworld sells for $25 but figured I'd look like I was out playing Quidditch.
 

dduelin

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For light to medium duty occasional use I think it’s hard to beat Frogg Toggs. They breathe and pack small and last me a few seasons of use. If you buy the motorcycle specific ones you get some light reflective piping. I wore them over mesh pants and jackets. In the Florida winter I’d use them to cut the wind on cool mornings and peel them off as the day warmed.
 

melensdad

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I threw away Frog Toggs. Didn’t even think they were worthy of donating to Goodwill.

People in the long distance hiking and backpacking community who are new tend to rave about them until they try something better. personally I think they are a step above the cheap plastic parkas.
Obviously opinions vary. Mine is only worth what you paid for it.

But I prefer the high tech (so called) breathable waterproof fabrics (Gore-Tex and knock-offs). Choose what you like but if you want the ‘best’ then I’d suggest something where the jacket and pants zip together or an outright suit. An over-layer is my personal choice.
 

potter0o

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The Scott rain gear looked really good. It was my second choice. I chose something comparable for a lower price. For the price of the Frog Toggs I thought it was worth spending a few dollars more.
 

Janus

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I have an Aerostitch R3. Why get off the bike if you're already weatherproofed?

I used to ride in Built "waterproof" Adventure kit but it barely survived the first Washington rain it experienced. In the winter I would have to hang it under the vent at work, and it would still be wet when I pulled it on to go home. DWR is woefully insufficient for anything more than a short sprinkle.

Banana suits are a decent compromise but I don't like knowing how much I'm sweating. They're quite a bit cheaper though. Quite a bit....
 

TigerDude

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It doesn’t exactly answer your question, but if it’s August in Georgia, my choice for rain gear would be a mesh jacket and pants. Let it rain and drench me, so I can finally get some relief from the heat! Seriously, in the summer I just wear clothes that dry quickly (no cotton), and I just get all wet. Less than an hour or so of riding after the rain, I’m dry.

Nothing is worse than putting on a rain suit in summer, then sweating inside that hot rain suit. Putting on a rain suit in summer is a last resort, and only if you anticipate much more rain than a brief shower.

Winter riding would be a different story.
This. I had the chance to try a fancy Aerostich in the rain in the summer and I couldn't tell the different between it & a plastic layer. I guess in the fall/spring it'd be good. I'm resigned to the sweatsuit if I need to ride through the rain & it's too cool to just get wet.
 

Klap

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Another vote for Frog Toggs. Mine are rarely used, but kept me dry a couple times . Generally, I compress it into a FoodSaver bag, suck all the air out and seal it. Packs small and keeps it nice and clean. I wear a ‘Stich when it’s cool enough, and never had it leak, even in frog-drowning downpours.
 

dduelin

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I have an Aerostitch R3. Why get off the bike if you're already weatherproofed?

I used to ride in Built "waterproof" Adventure kit but it barely survived the first Washington rain it experienced. In the winter I would have to hang it under the vent at work, and it would still be wet when I pulled it on to go home. DWR is woefully insufficient for anything more than a short sprinkle.

Banana suits are a decent compromise but I don't like knowing how much I'm sweating. They're quite a bit cheaper though. Quite a bit....
For the needs the OP stated a $1000 Stich or a $250 Klim rain jacket stashed in the frunk for occasional use might not be the best solution. I'm 5 years into my second Roadcrafter 1 pc and my latest investment is a GS Dry 2 pc so I appreciate and use good gear and I also still carry a Frogg Togg set when day riding close to home on summer days. For me it's still the best solution for summer day rides in 90F+ and near 100 % humidity. If I'm riding 500 miles to a campsite for a long weekend in the mountains like I did last weekend I'll wear the Aerostich because of it's versatility during travel and riding in 60 to 90F variation from valley to mountain top but it's not the thing for a 150 mile day ride close to home.
 

greenboy

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I had a Frogg Toggs set. One of the mid-priced ones. It falpped a lot and wore through in a few areas pretty quickly. If you are going to layer over mesh for when it's raining and a bit cooler, use it fairly often and at highway speeds I'd suggest something a bit more.

A mesh layering approach beats the hell out of any vented motorcycle suit/set from any brand if you want to beat the heat. It's a good way to go until you get into consistently lower temperatures.
 
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NickV

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Another one here for Frog Toggs. I had a horrible orange set that I wore in bad weather during motorcades and beyond all the flashing lights the nuclear creamsicle shade increased my visibility and kept me dry in Midwestern thunder storms.
 
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