Front Fork Broken :-(

cris

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Hello boys and girls
My Honda Nc 750x 2019 after 27,000 km the front fork has broken, the use of the motorcycle is daily and although I do 6 km of gravel every day, I do not drive more than 40 km there (if I know ... I am a girl) ... but I thought that the suspension would not rise so much, I measure 1.80 meters and weight 85 kg. Anyway, I need to repair and the HONDA dealer tells me that I practically have to change everything (and that diagnosis was given to me without disassembling ... just looking at the bike) ... CAN ANY CHARITABLE SOUL OF THE FORUM CAN TELL ME WHAT SPARE PART I SHOULD BUY? ... I am attaching the photo with the wake up so that you can help me if you wish! ... THANK YOU VERY MUCH!
 

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670cc

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The Honda dealer is wrong about changing nearly everything to do the repair. Worst case, you would need to replace the fork seal and replace the fork oil. It is also possible that there is simply debris in the seal lip. There are simple plastic tools, some homemade, that can be used to clean the seal.
 

MZ5

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^^^That^^^ is what I think at this point. It just looks like your fork seal is leaking. If the shiny silver tube is not scratched or bent, I don’t see why you’d need to replace anything but the seal. Like 670cc said, you may even be able to put a seal cleaning tool in there and remove grit, thus correcting the leak.

If I was replacing the seal, I’d also replace the bronze wear bushings inside. That’s another ~$20 or so, as I recall.
 

TacomaJD

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As dirty as everything is in the pics, I'm sure it's just debris caught in the seal allowing fork oil to bypass and leak out. Take something thin and stiff like a business card and flex it around the fork and down into the seal. This will not hurt anything. Swipe it up and down all the way around the fork a few times, dry all the fork oil off with a towel, then monitor it to see if it starts leaking again after riding. There also are some plastic type flexy things you can buy for this but anything you have around the house could work too.

Normally, after bikes get some age on them, fork seals can go bad and need replaced. Yours, however, is still pretty new so I almost have no doubt you just have debris trapped in the seal. If you are unable to get it to stop leaking, you may end up having to get the fork seals replaced. Regardless, arm yourself with knowledge as you are doing here and then go back to your dealer, or find someone else willing to do it if they still claim everything will need to be replaced. It probably won't be cheap either way as the forks will have to be pulled off the bike, drained of fluid, and disassembled to change the seals, so you will rack up some good shop labor costs. Seals and fork oil shouldn't be much more than $50.

PRO TIP: Keep the shiny silver shaft of your forks cleaned off as best as you can. This is how debris gets trapped in fork seals. Dirt, dust, bugs, whatever gets stuck to the shiny fork shaft/tube/whatever you want to call it, then upon uptravel, the fork seal inside of the lower fork tube travels up and over said debris, catching some of it on the way back down. Eventually it traps enough to start letting oil bypass the seal and leak out.

Good luck.
 

670cc

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Here is a link to a commercially sold simple tool to clean grit from under the fork seal. Some people make their own tool out of thin plastic sheet, like cut from a drink container. https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0395

If you decide to attempt to clean the seal yourself, we can provide more details on the procedure. Note that the black rubber seal you see at the top of the lower fork leg is a dust seal. You would peel that away fom the lower fork tube and raise it up out of the way, exposing the actual fork oil seal that is below the dust seal.
 
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Rapturee

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Hey Chris. I agree with many others here, it simply looks like dirt/debris in the seal and is easily cleaned with a small plastic tool. It is quite common. :{)
 

cris

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[QUOTE"TacomaJD, post: 227088, miembro: 7350"]
Tan sucio como todo está en las fotos, estoy seguro de que son sólo escombros atrapados en el sello permitiendo que el aceite de la horquilla se desvíe y se escape. Tome algo delgado y rígido como una tarjeta de visita y flexiona alrededor de la horquilla y hacia abajo en el sello. Esto no hará daño a nada. Desliza el dedo hacia arriba y hacia abajo alrededor de la horquilla unas cuantas veces, seca todo el aceite de la horquilla con una toalla y luego monitorízalo para ver si comienza a gotear de nuevo después de montar a caballo. También hay algunas cosas flexibles tipo plástico que puedes comprar para esto, pero cualquier cosa que tengas en la casa también podría funcionar.

Normalmente, después de que las bicicletas tienen alguna edad en ellos, los sellos de la horquilla pueden ir mal y necesitan ser reemplazados. El tuyo, sin embargo, sigue siendo bastante nuevo, así que casi no tengo duda de que sólo tienes escombros atrapados en el sello. Si no puede conseguir que deje de tener fugas, puede terminar teniendo que reemplazar los sellos de la horquilla. A pesar de todo, ártese con el conocimiento como lo está haciendo aquí y luego regrese a su distribuidor, o encuentre a alguien más dispuesto a hacerlo si todavía afirman que todo tendrá que ser reemplazado. Probablemente no será barato de cualquier manera, ya que las horquillas tendrán que ser sacadas de la bicicleta, drenadas de líquido, y desmontadas para cambiar los sellos, por lo que acumulará algunos buenos costos de mano de obra de la tienda. Los sellos y el aceite de tenedor no deberían ser mucho más de $50.

CONSEJO PRO: Mantenga el eje de plata brillante de sus horquillas limpiado lo mejor que pueda. Así es como los escombros quedan atrapados en las focas de la horquilla. Suciedad, polvo, insectos, lo que se pega al brillante eje de la horquilla / tubo / lo que quiera llamarlo, a continuación, en el bisel superior, el sello de la horquilla dentro del tubo de la horquilla inferior viaja hacia arriba y sobre dichos escombros, capturando parte de ella en el camino de vuelta hacia abajo. Eventualmente atrapa lo suficiente como para comenzar a dejar que el aceite pase por alto el sello y se escape.

Buena suerte.
[/QUOTE]

Muchas gracias por su explicación detallada, voy a hacer lo que usted menciona!
 
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cris

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[QUOTE"670cc, post: 227089, miembro: 201"]
Aquí hay un enlace a una herramienta simple que se vende comercialmente para limpiar la arena de debajo del sello de la horquilla. Algunas personas hacen su propia herramienta con lámina de plástico delgada, como cortar de un recipiente de bebidas. https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0395

Si decide limpiar el sello usted mismo, podemos proporcionar más detalles sobre el procedimiento. Tenga en cuenta que el sello de goma negro que se ve en la parte superior de la pata de la horquilla inferior es un sello de polvo. Pelar eso de distancia el tubo inferior de la horquilla y elevarlo fuera del camino, exponiendo el sello de aceite de la horquilla real que está por debajo del sello de polvo.
[/QUOTE]

Apreciaría la información sobre cómo realizar la operación, realmente no me gustó cómo me trataron en el concesionario Honda
 
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Willie

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Your problem is in fact, just the seals, I think your dealer is trying to take advantage of you, good for you for researching. Like the others have said, probably dirty seal.
Good Luck and happy safe riding.
 

DirtFlier

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When you use the plastic tool to clear debris from under the fork seal, it helps to use an aerosol spray cleaner at the same time to wash away anything caught under the seal.
 

MZ5

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I agree, but DO NOT use such a product while you have something (a tool) stuck under the seal. That will let solvent get into the fork and disrupt the lubricant properties of the fork oil.
 

Trevboyy

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For the millionth time it is definitely the seal. Ive had both of mine go out already and i only have 12k miles on mine. However i have taken it on some offroad trails and didnt clean my poles like i should have. But it sounds like all we have to do is just keep those forks nice and clean and GET THE SEALANT when replacing your seals, it will prolong your seals lifespan, and also double check to make sure that fork oil isnt on your disc!
 

kpinvt

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I have a pair of ugly nylon wrap around gaiters that velcro close. You can see them on the bike in my avatar. The were sold by Hippo Hands not long before the company shut down. They have worked very well on a variety of bikes for about a dozen years.
 
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